Linux fréttir

CFTC Files Lawsuit Against Decentralized Autonomous Organization

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 16:00
In a first, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has sued a decentralized autonomous organization, including the holders of governance tokens. From a report: The CFTC unveiled late Thursday a $250,000 penalty and settlement with bZeroX, LLC and its founders, Kyle Kistner and Tom Bean. The two oversaw the development of the bZx protocol, a protocol for decentralized lending and other activities. The bZx protocol drew headlines in 2020 after suffering code exploits, resulting in the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars with of crypto. But the CFTC's action today including the filing of a lawsuit against Ooki DAO, which in 2021 was used to govern the protocol as part of a decentralization effort, could have the broader impact.

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Google CEO Pichai Tells Employees Not To 'Equate Fun With Money' in Heated All-Hands Meeting

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 15:27
As Google tries to navigate an unfamiliar environment of slowing growth, cost-cutting and employee dissent over cultural changes, CEO Sundar Pichai is finding himself on the defensive. From a report: At a companywide all-hands meeting this week, Pichai was faced with tough questions from employees related to cuts to travel and entertainment budgets, managing productivity, and potential layoffs, according to audio obtained by CNBC. Pichai was asked, in a question that was highly rated by staffers on Google's internal Dory system, why the company is "nickel-and-diming employees" by slashing travel and swag budgets at a time when "Google has record profits and huge cash reserves," as it did coming out of the Covid pandemic. "How do I say it?" Pichai began his measured response. "Look, I hope all of you are reading the news, externally. The fact that you know, we are being a bit more responsible through one of the toughest macroeconomic conditions underway in the past decade, I think it's important that as a company, we pull together to get through moments like this."

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Iran blocks Whatsapp, Instagram as citizens protest death of Mahsa Amini

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 15:24
Also: New 'magnet of threats' attackers and FBI has details on Iran's online incursion into Albania

Iran is experiencing a near-total internet service disruption in the west and intermittent interruptions nationwide, with access to Instagram, Whatsapp and some mobile networks being blocked, says Netblocks.…

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Australia Phones Cyber-Attack Exposes Personal Data

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 14:40
Australia's second-largest telecommunications company, Optus, has reported a cyber-attack. The breach exposed customers' names, dates of birth, phone numbers and email addresses. From a report: The company - which has more than ten million subscribers - says it has shut down the attack but not before other details such as driver's licences and passport numbers were hacked. Optus says payment data and account passwords were not compromised. The company said it would notify those at "heightened risk" but all customers should check their accounts. Chief executive Kelly Bayer Rosmarin apologised to its customers, on ABC TV. She said names, dates of birth and contact details had been accessed, "in some cases" the driving licence number, and in "a rare number of cases the passport and the mailing address" had also been exposed. The company had notified the Australian Federal Police after noticing "unusual activity." And investigators were trying "to understand who has been accessing the data and for what purpose."

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Starlink broadband speeds slow as subscriber numbers grow

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 14:34
But a median of 60Mbps is not to be sniffed at when you're out in the sticks

Elon Musk's Starlink satellite broadband service has seen a decline in download speeds around the world as more and more subscribers sign up, perhaps making the company a victim of its own success.…

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France Sets Minimum Delivery Fee For Online Book Sales To Help Independent Stores Compete

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 14:00
France plans to impose a minimum delivery fee of 3 euros ($2.93) for online book orders of less than 35 euros to level the playing field for independent bookstores struggling to compete against e-commerce giants, the government said on Friday. From a report: A 2014 French law already prohibits free book deliveries, but Amazon and other vendors such as Fnac have circumvented this by charging a token 1 cent per delivery. Local book stores typically charge up to 7 euros for shipping a book. Legislation was passed in December 2021 to close the one-cent loophole through a minimum shipping fee, but the law could not take effect until the government had decided on the size of that fee. "This will adapt the book industry to the digital era by restoring an equilibrium between large e-commerce platforms, which offer virtually free delivery for books whatever the order size, and bookstores that cannot match these delivery prices," the culture and finance ministries said in a joint statement. They added that France will notify the European Commission of its plan and the minimum delivery fee will take effect six months after the EU grants approval.

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Microsoft highlights 'productivity paranoia' in remote work research

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 13:30
You know you're working, your colleagues know you're working, but the boss? Survey says: Paranoid

The vast majority of employees working remotely are satisfied with their output but employers still don't know just how fruitful their staff are when away from the office, leading to "productivity paranoia."…

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Meta Sued For Skirting Apple Privacy Rules To Snoop On Users

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 13:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Meta was sued for allegedly building a secret work-around to safeguards that Apple launched last year to protect iPhone users from having their internet activity tracked. In a proposed class-action complaint filed Wednesday in San Francisco federal court, two Facebook users accused the company of skirting Apple's 2021 privacy rules and violating state and federal laws limiting the unauthorized collection of personal data. A similar complaint was filed in the same court last week. The suits are based on a report by data privacy researcher Felix Krause, who said that Meta's Facebook and Instagram apps for Apple's iOS inject JavaScript code onto websites visited by users. Krause said the code allowed the apps to track "anything you do on any website," including typing passwords. According to the suits, Meta's collection of user data from the Facebook app helps it circumvent rules instituted by Apple in 2021 requiring all third-party apps to obtain consent from users before tracking their activities, online or off. Meta has said it expected to miss out on $10 billion in ad revenue in 2022 because of Apple's changes. The Facebook app gets around Apple privacy rules by opening web links in an in-app browser, rather than the user's default browser, according to Wednesday's complaint. "This allows Meta to intercept, monitor and record its users' interactions and communications with third parties, providing data to Meta that it aggregates, analyzes, and uses to boost its advertising revenue," according to the suit. A Meta spokesperson said the allegations are "without merit" and the company will defend itself. "We have designed our in-app browser to respect users' privacy choices, including how data may be used for ads," the company said in an emailed statement.

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Businesses can halve 'megavendor' software costs with third-party support

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 12:30
COVID-19, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, growing inflation, and the threat of recession driving adoption

Businesses can cut the cost of maintaining ageing enterprise software in half with judicious use of third-party support vendors, according to research outfit Gartner.…

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Teams of aerial drones might one day help to build houses

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 11:30
Wasp-like technique could be used to 3D-print structures in that remote place you plan to retire in

Flying robots could be the answer to the challenge of building structures in remote locations or hard-to-reach spots, according to engineers who have developed a drone-based approach to 3D printing.…

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Good news for UK tech contractors as govt repeals IR35 tax rules

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 11:05
Controversial reforms ditched but expert notes HMRC thinks 90% don't comply

The UK government has announced plans to repeal the controversial reform to off-payroll taxation, a set of rules which applied to IT contractors who move between companies.…

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Water Found In Asteroid Dust May Offer Clues To Origins of Life On Earth

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 10:00
Specks of dust that a Japanese space probe retrieved from an asteroid about 186 million miles (300m kilometers) from Earth have revealed a surprising component: a drop of water. The discovery offers new support for the theory that life on Earth may have been seeded from outer space. The Guardian reports: The findings are in the latest research to be published from analysis of 5.4 grammes of stones and dust that the Hayabusa-2 probe gathered from the asteroid Ryugu. "This drop of water has great meaning," the lead scientist, Tomoki Nakamura of Tohoku University, told reporters before publication of the research in the journal Science on Friday. "Many researchers believe that water was brought [from outer space], but we actually discovered water in Ryugu, an asteroid near Earth, for the first time." Hayabusa-2 was launched in 2014 on its mission to Ryugu, and returned to Earth's orbit two years ago to drop off a capsule containing the sample. The precious cargo has already yielded several insights, including organic material that showed some of the building blocks of life on Earth, amino acids, may have been formed in space. The team's latest discovery was a drop of fluid in the Ryugu sample "which was carbonated water containing salt and organic matter," Nakamura said. That bolsters the theory that asteroids such as Ryugu, or its larger parent asteroid, could have "provided water, which contains salt and organic matter" in collisions with Earth, he said. "We have discovered evidence that this may have been directly linked to, for example, the origin of the oceans or organic matter on Earth." "The fact that water was discovered in the sample itself is surprising," given its fragility and the chances of it being destroyed in outer space, said Kensei Kobayashi, an astrobiology expert and professor emeritus at Yokohama National University. "It does suggest that the asteroid contained water, in the form of fluid and not just ice, and organic matter may have been generated in that water."

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Lenovo marks 30 years of ThinkSystem with slew of new kit

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 09:33
Servers sure to sport AMD's Epyc Genoa or Intel's Sapphire Rapids but certain specs still under wraps

Lenovo has a wave of over 50 products and services coming to coincide with the 30th anniversary of ThinkSystem servers, including AMD and Intel-based hardware, edge systems, storage arrays and a unified management platform.…

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BT's emergency call handlers will join pay strikes

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 08:29
Four fresh dates organized for industrial action as union puts the squeeze on biz

Tens of thousands of BT Group engineers and call center workers, including those who handle emergency calls, are scheduled to go on strike for a total of four days next month in a long-running pay dispute.…

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Datacenter migration plan missed one vital detail: The leaky roof

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 07:30
Some drip forgot to tell the designers until the renovation had begun

On-Call If it's Friday it must be time for another episode of On Call, The Register's weekly column celebrating readers' escapes from nasty scrapes.…

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Maarten Schmidt, First Astronomer to Identify a Quasar, Dies at 92

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 07:00
Maarten Schmidt, who in 1963 became the first astronomer to identify a quasar, a small, intensely bright object several billion light years away, and in the process upended standard descriptions of the universe and revolutionized ideas about its evolution, died on Sept. 17 at his home in Fresno, Calif. He was 92. The New York Times reports: Dr. Schmidt's discovery of what was then among the farthest known objects in the universe answered one of the great conundrums of postwar astronomy, and like all great breakthroughs it opened the door to a whole host of new questions. Advances in radio technology during World War II allowed scientists in the 1950s to probe deeper into the universe than they could with traditional optical telescopes. But in doing so they picked up radio signals from a plethora of faint or even invisible, but intensely energetic, objects that did not fit with any conventional category of celestial body. Researchers called them "quasi-stellar radio sources," or quasars, for short -- even though no one could figure out what a quasar was. Many thought they were small, dense stars nearby, within the Milky Way. In 1962, two scientists in Australia, Cyril Hazard and John Bolton, finally managed to pinpoint the precise position of one of these, called 3C 273. They shared the data with several researchers, including Dr. Schmidt, an astronomer at the California Institute of Technology. Using the enormous 200-inch telescope at the Palomar Observatory, in rural San Diego County, Dr. Schmidt was able to hone in on what appeared to be a faint blue star. He then plotted its light signature on a graph, showing where its constituent elements appeared in the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared. What he found was, at first, puzzling. The signatures, or spectral lines, did not resemble those of any known elements. He stared at the graphs for weeks, pacing his living room floor, until he realized: The expected elements were all there, but they had shifted toward the red end of the spectrum -- an indication that the object was moving away from Earth, and fast. And once he knew the speed -- 30,000 miles a second -- Dr. Schmidt could calculate the object's distance. His jaw dropped. At about 2.4 billion light years away, 3C 273 was one of the most distant objects in the universe from Earth. That distance meant that it was also unbelievably luminous: If it were placed at the position of Proxima Centauri, the closest star to Earth, it would outshine the sun. Dr. Schmidt shared his results with his colleagues, and then in a paper in the journal Nature -- and not without trepidation, knowing how disruptive his findings would be. [...] The revelation shocked the astronomy world, and for a time made Dr. Schmidt something of a celebrity. Time magazine put him on its cover in 1966, with a fawning profile that compared him to Galileo. "The 17th century Italian startled scientists and theologians alike; the 20th century Dutchman has had an equally jarring effect on his own contemporaries," Time wrote, a bit breathlessly but not inaccurately. [...] For their work on quasars, in 2008 Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Lynden-Bell shared the prestigious Kavli Prize in Astrophysics.

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Privacy watchdog steps up fight against Europol's hoarding of personal data

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 06:27
If you could stop storing records on people unconnected to any crimes, that would be great

An EU watchdog says rules that allow Europol cops to retain personal data on individuals with no links to criminal activity go against Europe's own data privacy protections, not to mention undermining the regulator's powers and role.…

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Magnus Carlsen Finally Speaks On Chess Cheating Scandal, Sows Even More Chaos

Slashdot - Fri, 2022-09-23 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: Chess's top-ranked player, Magnus Carlsen, has finally spoken about the ongoing alleged cheating scandal that has rocked the chess world for the last several weeks and was reignited when Carlsen resigned in protest after making one move against Hans Niemann. Niemann, of course, was accused of cheating against Carlsen earlier this month, but no one has been able to prove this, nor has a mechanism for the supposed cheating been proven. "I think the whole world is wondering, what is the reason you withdrew [against Niemann]?" a newscaster with Chess24 asked. "Unfortunately I cannot particularly speak on that," Carlsen said. "But, you know, people can draw their own conclusion and they certainly have. I have to say I'm very impressed by Niemann's play, and I think his mentor Maxine Dlugy must be doing a great job." "I will not comment on that," he added when asked if he was accusing Niemann of cheating. He was then asked if he was accusing Dlugy, who is a chess grandmaster, of helping Niemann cheat: "No, I will not say more about that subject ... I hope to say a little bit more after the tournament." Carlsen was then asked if he thought cheating was a problem in chess. "I think individual people will answer the question differently depending on their own experiences. Regardless of whether it's a massive problem or not, it's, I think, fairly easy to cheat. On a general basis, cheaters in the future, it should not be taken lightly neither online nor over the board." Chess watchers believe that by namedropping Maxine Dlugy, Carlsen is putting down more breadcrumbs. Dlugy is is a Russian-born, American chess grandmaster who currently operates the Chess Max Academy in Manhattan. In July, Dlugy posted a photo with "my student Hans Niemann," congratulating him on "becoming a top 50 player in the world! Go Hans!" After Niemann beat Carlsen earlier this month, Dlugy posted a congratulatory message: "Just 16 months ago or so, I recommended to Hans to really focus on endings. He devoted a lot of time to this pivotal part of the game and today I am proud to say that his endgame play is sufficient to beat the reigning World Champion from a better position. That's powerful! Hans Niemann -- Chess speaks for itself!" Redditors were quick to point out, however, that Dlugy has his own controversy. Dlugy has been removed twice from a weekly Chess.com tournament called Titled Tuesday, in 2017 and 2020. Benjamin Bok, a chess grandmaster and Twitch streamer, for example, made a whole segment delving into some of Dlugy's old Chess.com matches and pointing out that Dlugy was suddenly removed from Chess.com with no explanation: "Generally that only means one thing," Bok said, not elaborating on what it means, but heavily implying that it means he was caught cheating. "Draw your own conclusions. Draw your own conclusions. That's all I'm going to say." "Question becomes: Is perhaps Dlugy Hans' accomplice, in case Hans is cheating? We'll have to wait and see," Bok says. "But the fact that Magnus makes that statement and drops his name, it means that he knows something we don't know. You can't just drop someone's name in there without really knowing stuff. I feel like he knows something really big."

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Amazon accused of singling out, harassing union organizers

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 02:40
Bosses' bad behavior may, just may, have derailed crucial warehouse vote

Amazon is running out of time to answer allegations from an American watchdog that it unlawfully suppressed labor organizers at one of its warehouses in New York. …

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Meta accused of breaking the law by secretly tracking iPhone users

TheRegister - Fri, 2022-09-23 01:25
Ad goliath reckons complaint is meritless – but it would, wouldn't it?

Meta was sued on Wednesday for alleged undisclosed tracking and data collection in its Facebook and Instagram apps on Apple iPhones.…

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