Linux fréttir

Former Googler Anthony Levandowski ‘fesses up to pinching trade secrets about self-driving cars

TheRegister - Fri, 2020-03-20 01:46
But only for a progress update document, as Feds recommend 30-month stretch after reaching a deal on theft of IP that made its way to Uber

Former Google exec Anthony Levandowski has agreed to plead guilty to pinching secrets about Google’s self-driving car tech and sharing them with Uber.…

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Magic Leap Wants Workers To Use Its Headsets While They're Stuck At Home

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-03-20 01:30
Mixed reality startup Magic Leap is trying to tempt potential buyers with a package for people stuck working from home. The Verge reports: The "Collaboration Package" is a 45-day trial of four Magic Leap headsets, plus access to Spatial, a virtual collaboration program. It costs $5,000, with the option to extend the license or send the headsets back afterward. Spatial creates avatars of users based on photos, then lets them hold meetings with these avatars and virtual screens. It isn't exclusive to Magic Leap or mixed reality headsets; the software also works across computers and phones. But headsets can (in some ways) more realistically simulate sharing a room with a distant colleague.

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IT Security Report Finds 97 Percent Have Suspicious Network Activity

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-03-20 00:50
According to a 13-page study from IT security vendor Positive Technologies, a whopping 97% of surveyed companies with at least 1,000 employees show evidence of suspicious activity in their network traffic and that 81% of the companies were being subject to malicious activity. TechRepublic reports: "In one in every three companies, there were traces of scans of its internal network, which could potentially mean that hackers are gathering intelligence inside the infrastructure. This includes network scans, multiple failed attempts to connect to hosts, and traces of collecting intelligence on active network sessions on a specific host or in the entire domain." Another alarming statistic from the research showed that 94% of the participating companies in the study suffered from noncompliance with their corporate security policies within their IT infrastructure systems, leaving them more vulnerable to successful cyberattacks, according to the report. Noncompliance with IT security policies "has a direct impact on security deterioration, by practically opening the door for the hackers to exploit," the report continued. Also worrisome is that 81% of the participating companies are transmitting their sensitive data in clear text, or text that is not encrypted or meant to be encrypted, according to the research. By using only risky clear text, companies can enable potential hackers to search their network traffic for logins and passwords which are moving between and across corporate networks. Meanwhile, some 67% of the companies allow the use of remote access software, such as RAdmin, TeamViewer, and Ammyy Admin, which can also be compromised by attackers to move along the network while remaining undetected by security tools, the report states. In addition, workers in 44% of the companies use BitTorrent for data transfer, which dramatically can increase the risk of malware infection. Ultimately, 92% of these network security threats were detected inside the perimeters of the companies that were surveyed, according to the report, which reveals the depth of the problems and the need for constant internal network monitoring.

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Experts Say the Internet Will Mostly Stay Online During Coronavirus Pandemic

Slashdot - Fri, 2020-03-20 00:11
As millions of Americans hunker down to slow the spread of COVID-19, U.S. broadband networks are seeing a significant spike in usage. While industry insiders say that the U.S. internet should be able to handle the strain overall, broadband availability, affordability, and slow speeds could still pose a serious problem for many housebound U.S. residents. From a report: In a blog post, Cloudflare noted that Seattle, ground zero for the U.S. coronavirus spread, has seen internet usage spike by some 40 percent. Key internet exchanges in cities like Amsterdam, London, and Frankfurt have seen a 10 to 20 percent spike in traffic since around March 9. ISPs use a number of modern network technologies to handle congestion in real time, often letting them intelligently and automatically "deprioritize" the traffic of heavy users in overloaded areas. Even then, the massive surge in usage will likely impact U.S. broadband speeds in the weeks and months to come, industry trackers say. Broadband Now, a company that tracks U.S. broadband availability and speed, told Motherboard that six of the biggest U.S. cities by population have seen little to no change in median speed test results from the past 11 weeks.

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Bad news: Coronavirus is spreading rapidly across the world. Good news: Nitrogen dioxide levels are decreasing and the air on Earth is cleaner

TheRegister - Fri, 2020-03-20 00:09
As humans stay put at home, fossil fuel consumption levels decline

As the world scrambles to mitigate the global novel coronavirus pandemic, there is at least one silver lining among the upheaval: air pollution has dropped.…

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Gaming Peripheral Company Razer Shifts Some Production To Surgical Masks

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 23:30
Razer CEO Ming-Liang Tan announced on Thursday that the company will shift a number of its manufacturing lines from producing its own products to making surgical masks. Polygon reports: As COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, continues to spread around the world, healthcare officials are reporting shortages of essential resources, including surgical masks. Tan said Razer intends donate up to 1 million masks to healthcare providers globally; its first shipments will go to healthcare authorities in Singapore, where Razer's Southeast Asia headquarters is located. The Razer CEO said designers and engineers have been working "24-hour shifts" to convert the company's production lines. "While there has been incredible demand for our products during this time with many staying home to avoid the crowds (and to play games), the team at Razer understands that all of us have a part to play in fighting the virus -- no matter which industry we come from," Tan said. He added that "emergency conversion" of Razer's manufacturing lines is the first step in the company's plan. "We are committed to contributing our extra time, resources, effort and talent toward the fight against COVID-19," Tan said. Elon Musk said on Twitter that Tesla "would make ventilators if there is a shortage." This prompted New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio to tweet out the plea: "Our country is facing a drastic shortage and we need ventilators ASAP -- we will need thousands in this city over the next few weeks. We're getting them as fast as we can but we could use your help!"

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Open-Source Project Spins Up 3D-Printed Ventilator Validation Prototype In Just One Week

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 22:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: In a great example of what can happen when smart, technically-oriented people come together in a time of need, an open-source hardware project started by a group including Irish entrepreneur Colin Keogh and Breeze Automation CEO and co-founder Gui Calavanti has produced a prototype ventilator using 3D-printed parts and readily available, inexpensive material. The ventilator prototype was designed and produced in just seven days, after the project spun up on Facebook and attracted participation from over 300 engineers, medical professionals and researchers. The prototype will now enter into a validation process by the Irish Health Services Executive (HSE), the country's health regulatory body. This will technically only validate it for use in Ireland, which ironically looks relatively well-stocked for ventilator hardware, but it will be a key stamp of approval that could pave the way for its deployment across countries where there are shortages, including low-income nations. The group behind the ventilator also recently changed the focus of their Facebook community, renaming the group from the Open Source Ventilator Project to the Open Source COVID19 Medical Supplies community. They're looking at expanding their focus to finding ways to cheaply and effectively build and validate other needed equipment, including protective gear like masks, sanitizer and protective face guards for front-line healthcare workers.

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The New iPad Pro's LIDAR Sensor Is An AR Hardware Solution In Search of Software

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 22:10
One of the biggest new additions to Apple's new iPad Pro is a new "Light Detection and Ranging" (LIDAR) system on the rear camera, which Apple argued was the missing piece for revolutionary augmented reality applications. "It claims that by combining the depth information from the LIDAR scanner with camera data, motion sensors, and computer vision algorithms, the new iPad Pro will be faster and better at placing AR objects and tracking the location of people," reports The Verge. "But it doesn't change the fact that, right now, there still aren't a lot of compelling reasons to actually use augmented reality apps on a mobile device beyond the cool, tech-demo-y purposes that already exist." From the report: R apps on iOS today are a thing you try out once, marvel at how novel of an idea it is, and move on -- they're not essential parts of how we use our phones. And nearly three years into Apple's push for AR, there's still no killer app that makes the case for why customers -- or developers -- should care. Maybe the LIDAR sensor really is the missing piece of the puzzle. Apple certainly has a few impressive tech demos showing off applications of the LIDAR sensor, like its Apple Arcade Hot Lava game, which can use the data to more quickly and accurately model a living room to generate the gameplay surface. There's a CAD app that can scan and make a 3D model of the room to see how additions will look. Another demo promises accurate determinations of the range of motion of your arm. The fact that Apple is debuting the iPad for AR doesn't help the case, either. While Apple has been rumored to be working on a proper augmented reality headset or glasses for years -- a kind of product that could make augmented digital overlays a seamless part of your day-to-day life -- the iPad (in 11-inch and 12.9-inch sizes) is effectively the opposite of that idea. It's the same awkwardness of the man who holds up an iPad to film an entire concert; holding a hardcover book-sized display in front of your face for the entire time you're using it just isn't a very natural use case. It's possible that Apple is just laying the groundwork here, and more portable LIDAR-equipped AR devices (like a new iPhone or even a head-mounted display) are on their way in the future. Maybe the LIDAR sensor is the key to making more immersive, faster, and better augmented apps. Apple might be right, and the next wave of AR apps really will turn the gimmicks into a critical part of day-to-day life. But right now, it's hard not to look at Apple's LIDAR-based AR push as another hardware feature looking for the software to justify it.

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What do you not want right now? A bunch of Cisco SD-WAN, Webex vulnerabilities? Here are a bunch of them

TheRegister - Thu, 2020-03-19 21:30
Switchzilla says remote networking gear has a grab-bag of holes

Cisco has issued a series of security updates for its SD-WAN and Webex software, just when they're most needed.…

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DirectX 12 Ultimate is an Attempt To 'Future-Proof' Graphics Hardware

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 21:30
A new DirectX badge is going to start showing up on graphics hardware: It's called DirectX 12 Ultimate, and it denotes support for "ALL next generation graphics hardware features," Microsoft announced today. From a report: DirectX is a collection of application programming languages (APIs) that developers use to communicate with your hardware. You can think of it like a conduit between software (especially games) and hardware. Up until now, DX12 was the latest version, supported in Windows 10 (and also in Windows 7 for some games). Now that distinction belongs to DX12 Ultimate. It's not an overhaul of the API, but a culmination of the latest technologies bundled into one. This notably includes DirectX Raytracing (DXR), variable rate shading (VRS), mesh shaders, and sampler feedback. One of the reasons Microsoft is doing this is to unify experiences across the PC and its upcoming Xbox Series X, which will launch November 26, 2020 (Thanksgiving Day). "These features represent many years of innovation from Microsoft and our partners in the hardware industry. DX12 Ultimate brings them all together in one common bundle, providing developers with a single key to unlock next generation graphics on PC and Xbox Series X," Microsoft explains. The main benefit for gamers is knowing, at a glance, if the graphics card they are about to buy supports all the latest features. Spotting the DX12 Ultimate badge is the key, and I suspect hardware makers will be quick to promote it. Related to that, Microsoft is pitching this as a way of ensuring "future-proof" feature support. There's no such thing as future proofing, of course, but DX12 Ultimate should remain relevant for at least the next couple of years.

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Intel's Neuromorphic Chip Learns To 'Smell' 10 Hazardous Chemicals

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 20:50
Researchers from Intel and Cornell University trained a neuromorphic chip to learn and recognize the scents of 10 hazardous chemicals. Engadget reports: Using Intel's Loihi, a neuromorphic chip, the team designed an algorithm based on the brain's olfactory circuit. When you take a whiff of something, molecules stimulate olfactory cells in your nose. Those cells send signals to the brain's olfactory system, which then fires off electrical pulses. The researchers were able to mimic that circuitry in Loihi's silicon circuits. According to Intel, the chip can identify 10 smells, including acetone, ammonia and methane, even when other strong smells are present. And, Loihi learned each odor with just a single sample. That's especially impressive, the researchers say, because other deep learning techniques can require 3,000 times more training samples to reach the same level of accuracy. The work has been published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence.

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Twitter Broadly Bans Any COVID-19 Tweets That Could Help the Virus Spread

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 20:10
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: On Wednesday, Twitter updated its safety policy to prohibit tweets that "could place people at a higher risk of transmitting COVID-19." The new policy bans tweets denying expert guidance on the virus, encouraging "fake or ineffective treatments, preventions and diagnostic techniques" as well as tweets that mislead users by pretending to be from health authorities or experts. In its blog post, Twitter says that it will "require people to remove Tweets" in these cases and we've asked the company for more clarification on what that looks like. Twitter indicated that it will take context like account history into account in making its enforcement determinations, which it says remain unchanged. As far as having users remove offending tweets, according to the company's existing guidance "When we determine that a Tweet violated the Twitter Rules, we require the violator to remove it before they can Tweet again." A user is notified of this via email and given a chance to delete the tweet or make an appeal. While that is happening, the tweet is hidden from view. Under the ruleset, a tweet that claims "social distancing is not effective" would be subject to removal. Twitter will also require users to delete tweets telling followers to do ineffective or dangerous things like drinking bleach, even if the tweet is "made in jest" because that content can prove harmful when taken out of context. Twitter is banning tweets encouraging people to behave in a way counter to what health authorities recommend. The rules will also prohibit users from playing armchair doctor, as well as making coronavirus claims that single out groups of people based on race or nationality.

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HMD Global pokes head out of quarantine to show off 3 new Nokia mobiles

TheRegister - Thu, 2020-03-19 20:00
Bet you never thought you'd see a 5G Nokia

The cancellation of Mobile World Congress might have derailed HMD Global's launch plans, but the Espoo-based licensor of the iconic Nokia marque has nonetheless unveiled three new smartphones. Arguably the most exciting is the Nokia 8.3 5G.…

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Russian state-sponsored hackers have been sniffing Middle East defence firms, warns Trend Micro

TheRegister - Thu, 2020-03-19 19:42
Artists variously known as Pawn Storm and APT28 are still at it

The Russian hacking crew known variously as APT28, Fancy Bear and Pawn Storm has been targeting defence companies with Middle Eastern outposts, according to Trend Micro.…

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Intel Says It Is Delivering More Than 90% of Products on Time

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 19:30
Intel, the world's biggest chipmaker, said it's maintaining above 90% on-time delivery of its products from factories worldwide. From a report: Chief Executive Officer Bob Swan told customers in a letter posted on the company's website that he is "inspired by the deep commitment of our teams to sustain our manufacturing, assembly, test and supply chain operations in Oregon, New Mexico, California and Arizona, as well as Israel, Ireland, China, Malaysia, Vietnam and other Intel and partner locations around the world." "They are working hard to make sure you can continue to be successful," he added. Intel's products are essential components of personal computers and the server machines that run corporate networks and the internet. Continued output from its factories is a vital part of the global supply chain as the technology industry scrambles to deal with the effects of the pandemic. Semiconductor plants are some of the most automated facilities in the world and require very little human involvement directly in the manufacturing process. The electronic components take as long as three months to get through the multistep process. That means chips coming out of Intel's plants now would have been started before the Covid-19 virus kicked in and caused a lockdown of big chunks of the world's population.

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Netflix To Reduce EU Bandwidth by 25%

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 18:50
Netflix is cutting back on the bandwidth it takes to stream videos to members in the European Union after a European Commission member voiced concerns over network strain. From a report: "Following the discussions between Commissioner Thierry Breton and Reed Hastings -- and given the extraordinary challenges raised by the coronavirus -- Netflix has decided to begin reducing bit rates across all our streams in Europe for 30 days," a Netflix spokesperson told Protocol. "We estimate that this will reduce Netflix traffic on European networks by around 25 percent while also ensuring a good quality service for our members."

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FDA Testing Coronavirus Treatments, Including Chloroquine, Plasma From Recovered COVID-19 Patients

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 18:10
U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn addressed the ongoing work of the agency in terms of its work on potential treatments and vaccines for the COVID-19 coronavirus currently spreading globally. From a report: Despite a claim early in Thursday's White House briefing on the pandemic by President Donald Trump that one proposed treatment, anti-malarial chloroquine, had already been approved by the FDA for COVID-19 treatment, Hahn said that in fact the agency is currently looking at widespread clinical trials of the drug, but it is not yet approved for that use. "In the short term, we're looking at drugs that are already approved for other indications," Dr. Hahn said. "Many Americans have read studies and heard media reports about this drug chloroquine, which is an anti-malarial drug. It's already approved, as the president said, for the treatment of malaria [Trump had not said this, but had instead said it was now approved for COVID-19] as well as an arthritis condition. That's a drug that the president has directed us to take a closer look at, as to whether an expanded use approach to that could be done to actually see if that benefits patients. And again, we want to do that in the setting of a clinical trial, a large pragmatic clinical trial to actually gather that information and answer the question that needs to be answered." Another potential treatment which has shown signs of possible positive effect, remdesivir, was also cited by Trump as being very "near" approval for use by the FDA. Hahn clarified that in fact, while remdesivir is currently undergoing clinical trials, it's following the normal FDA process for approval for clinical medical therapeutic use in the U.S.

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Scribd is Giving Away 1 Month of Unlimited Access For Free

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 17:30
Reading subscription service Scribd is offering free access to its library of over one million ebooks, audiobooks, magazines and more for the next 30 days (no commitment or credit card information required). From a report: Scribd told Good e-Reader that "with the spread of COVID-19 and new regulations put into effect, we know many people are staying close to home, yet still looking for information, distractions and perhaps a mental escape. Scribd wants to support the community by giving people access to the world's largest library during this global health crisis, and do our small part in helping consumers through times of uncertainty."

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HMD Global revamps infamous commuter-botherer, the Nokia 5310 XpressMusic

TheRegister - Thu, 2020-03-19 17:00
The budget feature phone that reminds you of Ministry of Sound sounds and football fighting Brits... maybe

The Nokia 5310 XpressMusic was the bane of any mid-2000s commuter, used primarily by tracksuit-wearing hooligans to blast out head-thumping Ministry of Sound tunes to other weary bus-goers.…

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99% of Those Who Died From Virus Had Other Illness, Italy Says

Slashdot - Thu, 2020-03-19 16:50
More than 99% of Italy's coronavirus fatalities were people who suffered from previous medical conditions, according to a study [PDF] by the country's national health authority. Reader schwit1 shares a report: The new study could provide insight into why Italy's death rate, at about 8% of total infected people, is higher than in other countries. The Rome-based institute has examined medical records of about 18% of the country's coronavirus fatalities, finding that just three victims, or 0.8% of the total, had no previous pathology. Almost half of the victims suffered from at least three prior illnesses and about a fourth had either one or two previous conditions. More than 75% had high blood pressure, about 35% had diabetes and a third suffered from heart disease.

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