Linux fréttir

KmsdBot botnet is down after operator sends typo in command

TheRegister - 1 hour 8 min ago
Cashdollar - 'It’s not often we get this kind of story in security'

Somewhere out there, a botnet operator is kicking themselves and probably hoping no one noticed the typo they transmitted in a command that crashed their whole operation. …

Categories: Linux fréttir

Not all vendors' Arm-powered kit is created equally, benchmark fan finds

TheRegister - 2 hours 8 min ago
Shiny silicon plus Rusty drivers will eventually equal openly saucy happiness

Arm-powered laptops and desktops are appearing on the market, but external appearances are deceptive. These are very different from familiar x86-based PCs, as the accounts of those experimenting with them reveal.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Durham Uni and Dell co-design systems to help model the universe

TheRegister - 3 hours 8 min ago
A particle physicist, an astronomer and a cosmologist meet in a bar. You what, COSMA8?

The James Webb Space Telescope has served up impressive views of the cosmos since the first images were revealed back in July, but it is also providing data to other scientific endeavors, including cosmology projects such as those at Durham University in the northeast of England.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Rights groups threaten legal action over NHS data pilot based on Palantir tech

TheRegister - 4 hours 7 min ago
'Acute and justifiable fear' in the way patient data is set to be processed, campaigners warn

An NHS pilot to upload patient data in a data analytics system based on tech from Palantir is the subject of a legal threat from campaign groups who claim it appears to circumvent data protection and procurement laws.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

SpaceX Unveils 'Starshield,' a Military Variation of Starlink Satellites

Slashdot - 4 hours 39 min ago
Elon Musk's SpaceX is expanding its Starlink satellite technology into military applications with a new business line called Starshield. CNBC reports: "While Starlink is designed for consumer and commercial use, Starshield is designed for government use," the company wrote on its website. Few details are available about the intended scope and capabilities of Starshield. The company hasn't previously announced tests or work on Starshield technology. On its website, SpaceX said the system will have "an initial focus" on three areas: Imagery, communications and "hosted payloads" -- the third of which effectively offers government customers the company's satellite bus (the body of the spacecraft) as a flexible platform. The company also markets Starshield as the center of an "end-to-end" offering for national security: SpaceX would build everything from the ground antennas to the satellites, launch the latter with its rockets, and operate the network in space. SpaceX notes that Starshield uses "additional high-assurance cryptographic capability to host classified payloads and process data securely," building upon the data encryption it uses with its Starlink system. Another key feature: the "inter-satellite laser communications" links, which the company currently has connecting its Starlink spacecraft. It notes that the terminals can be added to "partner satellites," so as to connect other companies' government systems "into the Starshield network."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

How do you solve the problem that is Twitter?

TheRegister - 5 hours 8 min ago
Technically and leadership-wise what site needs is stability

Opinion It's a toss-up between Elon Musk's management misadventures and Twitter's technical troubles as to which will cause the most damage. …

Categories: Linux fréttir

Woman fakes pregnancy to smuggle hundreds of CPUs, iPhones into China

TheRegister - 6 hours 9 min ago
Now that's what we call Intel Inside

If you think you can fool customs officials into believing you are pregnant and not, in fact, smuggling hundreds of Intel processors and iPhones in a prosthetic strapped to your belly, think again.…

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Boeing swipes at Starlink as it finishes two internet slinging satellites

TheRegister - 7 hours 6 min ago
5,000 redirectable beams in each bird

Boeing has delivered a pair of O3b mPOWER satellites to telecom network provider SES – and had a dig at rival space broadband technologies along the way.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Microsoft-Backed Start-Up Heirloom Uses Limestone To Capture CO2

Slashdot - 7 hours 39 min ago
California-based startup Heirloom is using limestone to capture CO2 from the atmosphere to reduce carbon emissions and prevent the worst effects of global warming. CNBC reports: CO2 naturally occurs in limestone. Heirloom removes that CO2 by heating the limestone into a powder and stores the extracted CO2 underground. The remaining powder is then thirsty for more CO2. Heirloom spread that powder out on trays, with a robot determining location for maximum CO2 absorption. A process that naturally takes years is reduced to just three days. Once the powder is full, the process starts again. Heirloom's approach is relatively cheap compared with other types of carbon capture and removal and highly scalable, which made it attractive to investors like Microsoft. "We identified that Heirloom's enhanced mineralization approach used widely available materials as passive airflow technologies, [which] means it has a potential to reach a low cost trajectory that's really been a challenge to this industry as a whole," said Brandon Middaugh, director of the climate innovation fund at Microsoft. Heirloom says it plans to deploy its first site next year and aims to remove 1 billion tons of CO2 by 2035. It also sells carbon credits, which allow companies to offset their own CO2 emissions. Buyers include Microsoft, Stripe, Shopify and Klarna.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Cisco wriggles out from $2 billion bill for ‘willful and egregious’ patent infringements

TheRegister - 7 hours 42 min ago
Supreme Court won’t revisit case after agreeing conflict of interest trumped tech

Cisco has managed to avoid a $2-plus billion payment for patent infringement on a technicality hat has nothing to do with the patents.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

FTX Japan would let customers withdraw funds … if only anyone could log in

TheRegister - 8 hours 10 min ago
Add a busted tech platform to the list of the company's sins

FTX's Japanese outpost has teased good news for investors in the collapsed and disgraced trading platform – then dashed their hopes.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Meta threatens to stop sharing news in USA to protest publisher payment plan

TheRegister - 9 hours 9 min ago
Good luck with that, Zuck – remember how it worked out in Australia?

Meta, the social media conglomerate formerly known as Facebook, has threatened to remove news from its platforms if the US adopts a law that would force it to negotiate with publishers to pay them for allowing links to their content.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

China regulates use of motion detection to trigger smartphone ads

TheRegister - 10 hours 7 min ago
'Shake to jump' technique nixed a year after top apps put it to work

China's Telecommunication Terminal Industry Forum Association (TAF) has issued a raft of new regulations – including one that sets rules for when motion sensors can trigger smartphones to display ads or open websites.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Industrial robots in China push people out of jobs, slash wages

TheRegister - 11 hours 9 min ago
Exposed to 'droids? Symptoms may include disinterest, unemployment, lower pay, along with a bit of depopulation

Exposure to industrial robots in the workplace leads to less participation in the labor force, less employment, and less pay, according to economics researchers.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

'NASA's Plan To Make JWST Data Immediately Available Will Hurt Astronomy'

Slashdot - 11 hours 9 min ago
An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from an opinion piece in Scientific American, written by Jason Wright. Wright is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University, where he is director of the Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence Center. From the piece: In August the White House announced (PDF) that the results of all federally funded research should be freely accessible by the end of 2025. This will be a big change for scientists in many fields but ultimately a good move for the democratization of research. Under this new guidance, many peer-reviewed papers would be free for the world to read immediately upon publication rather than stuck behind expensive paywalls, and the data that underlay these papers would be fully available and properly archived for anyone who wanted to analyze them. As an astronomer, I'm pleased that our profession has been ahead of the curve on this, and most of the White House's recommendations are already standard in our field. NASA, as a federal agency that funds and conducts research, is onboard with the idea of freely accessible data. But it has a plan that goes much further than the White House's and that is highly problematic. The agency currently gives a proprietary period to some scientists who use particular facilities, such as a 12-month period for the powerful James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), so that those scientists can gather and analyze data carefully without fear of their work being poached. NASA is looking to end this policy in its effort to make science more open-access. Losing this exclusivity would be really bad for astronomy and planetary science. Without a proprietary period, an astronomer with a brilliant insight might spend years developing it, months crafting a successful proposal to execute it, and precious hours of highly competitive JWST time to actually perform the observations -- only to have someone else scoop up the data from a public archive and publish the result. This is a reasonable concern -- such scooping has happened before. Without a proprietary period during which the astronomers who proposed given observations have exclusive access to the data, those researchers will have to work very quickly in order to avoid being scooped. Receiving credit for discoveries is especially important for early-career astronomers looking to establish their credentials as they search for a permanent job. Under such time pressure, researchers will need to cut corners, such as skipping the checks and tests that define careful work. Such a sloppy approach will lead to hasty results and incorrect conclusions to the detriment of the entire field. It also can lead to the erosion of work-life boundaries, with astronomers working long hours, sacrificing their health and family time so their result gets out before the competition's. This is bad for the culture of science and disproportionately affects those with children or other time-consuming personal circumstances (such as being a student, a caretaker or a full-time college instructor while also performing research). Allowing researchers to properly benefit from their work is critical for making astronomy as fair and equitable as possible. [...] "One potential alternative is to create a professional requirement that those who proposed an observation but have not published from it should be offered co-authorship on any paper that uses the data," suggests Wright, noting that it's "not currently the cultural norm in astronomy" and "comes with a whole host of complications." "Another option is to change the standard for how credit is assigned for any observational work," adds Wright. "Astronomers could, for example, demand that any paper citing a result also cite the proposal that generated the enabling data. In this way, the proposal team could still accrue credit for its work, even if it wasn't the first to publish." "In the end, though, such adjustments are secondary to the heart of the matter, which is that NASA's plan to eliminate the proprietary period for JWST data is bad for astronomy."

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TSA to expand facial recognition across America

TheRegister - 12 hours 9 min ago
System is optional, for the moment

America's Transport Security Administration, better known as the TSA, has been testing facial recognition software to automatically screen passengers flying across the country in 16 airports. And now it's looking into rolling it out nationwide next year.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Microsoft Offers Sony a 10-Year Deal On New CoD Games, Plans To Raise Game Prices Next Year

Slashdot - 12 hours 37 min ago
In an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal today, Microsoft president Brad Smith said the company has offered Sony a 10-year contract to make future Call of Duty games available on PlayStation if its proposed Activision Blizzard acquisition gets approved. Microsoft initially offered to keep the popular game series on PlayStation for three years after the current agreement expires, but that deal was deemed inadequate by Sony's gaming chief Jim Ryan. "The main supposed potential anticompetitive risk Sony raises is that Microsoft would stop making 'Call of Duty' available on the PlayStation. But that would be economically irrational," Microsoft President Brad Smith said in the WSJ opinion piece. Microsoft also plans to increase the prices of its upcoming first-party Xbox games next year. The Verge's Tom Warren writes: From 2023 onward, new full-priced games from Xbox Game Studios like Redfall, Starfield, and Forza Motorsport will be priced at $69.99 instead of the usual $59.99. It's a price increase that matches the pricing that competitors like Sony, Ubisoft, and Take-Two all offer their own games at. Microsoft issued the following statement about the price increases: "We've held on price increases until after the holidays so families can enjoy the gift of gaming. Starting in 2023 our new, built for next-gen, full-priced games, including Forza Motorsport, Redfall, and Starfield, will launch at $69.99 USD on all platforms. This price reflects the content, scale, and technical complexity of these titles. As with all games developed by our teams at Xbox, they will also be available with Game Pass the same day they launch."

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Categories: Linux fréttir

Four suspects cuffed, face extradition over tax refund scam plot

TheRegister - 13 hours 9 min ago
We're not talking princes here

Four men suspected of plotting to commit wire fraud and identity theft have been arrested and now face extradition to America.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Crypto Exchange Gemini Trying To Recover $900 Million From Crypto Lender Genesis

Slashdot - 13 hours 14 min ago
Crypto broker Genesis and its parent company Digital Currency Group (DCG) owe customers of the Winklevoss twins' crypto exchange Gemini $900 million, the Financial Times reported on Saturday. Reuters reports: Crypto exchange Gemini is trying to recover the funds after Genesis was wrongfooted by last month's failure of Sam Bankman-Fried's FTX crypto group, the newspaper said, citing people familiar with the matter. Venture capital company Digital Currency Group, which owns Genesis Trading and cryptocurrency asset manager Grayscale, owes $575 million to Genesis' crypto lending arm, Digital Currency Chief Executive Barry Silbert told shareholders last month. Gemini, which runs a crypto lending product in partnership with Genesis, has now formed a creditors' committee to recoup the funds from Genesis and its parent DCG, the report added. Separately, Coindesk on Sunday reported that creditor groups in negotiation with Genesis currently account for $1.8 billion of loans, with that number likely to continue to grow. A second group of Genesis creditors, with loans also amounting to $900 million, is being represented by law firm Proskauer Rose, CoinDesk said citing a source. Further reading: Sam Bankman-Fried Says He Will Testify Before Congress On FTX Collapse

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

How 'Goblin Mode' Became Oxford's Word of the Year

Slashdot - 13 hours 54 min ago
This year, Oxford Languages, the creator of the Oxford English Dictionary, titled "goblin mode" as the 2022 Word of the Year, meaning it best reflected the ethos and mood of the past 12 months. The slang term is defined as a "type of behavior which is unapologetically self-indulgent, lazy, slovenly, or greedy, typically in a way that rejects social norms or expectations." NPR reports: The term first appeared on Twitter in 2009 but didn't go viral until 2022, according to Oxford Languages. "It captured the prevailing mood of individuals who rejected the idea of returning to 'normal life', or rebelled against the increasingly unattainable aesthetic standards and unsustainable lifestyles exhibited on social media," the group wrote in a press release. "People are embracing their inner goblin," said Casper Grathwohl, the president of Oxford Languages. The Word of the Year is typically based on analyzing language data on emerging words and their popularity. But this year, Oxford Languages incorporated a public vote into the process and asked people to cast their ballot between the top three expressions of the year: "goblin mode," "metaverse" and "#IStandWith." More than 300,000 people voted with an overwhelming majority -- about 93% -- favoring "goblin mode."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

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