Linux fréttir

Twitter Hits Back Again at Claims That Its Employees Monitor Direct Messages

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 14:10
From a report on TechCrunch: Twitter is pushing back against claims made by conservative activist group Project Veritas that its employees monitor private user data, including direct messages. In a statement to BuzzFeed News, a Twitter representative said "we do not proactively review DMs. Period. A limited number of employees have access to such information, for legitimate work purposes, and we enforce strict access protocols for those employees." Last week, Project Veritas, which produces undercover sting operations that purportedly expose liberal biases at media companies and other organizations, posted footage that appeared to show Twitter engineers claiming that teams of employees look at users' private data. One engineer seemed to say that Twitter can hand over President Donald Trump's data, including deleted tweets and direct messages, to the Department of Justice.

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Xiaomi the money: China's latest IPO star tastes of bubble tea

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 13:57
Geddit?

Analysis Xiaomi's rush to go public is as much a sign of a speculative bubble as Bitcoin mania. Will it have a happy ending?…

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Democrats Are Just One Vote Shy of Restoring Net Neutrality

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 13:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Engadget: Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer now says Democrats in the Senate are a single vote away from restoring net neutrality. According to the senator from New York, they now have a total of 50 votes for a Senate resolution of disapproval that would restore the Open Internet Order of 2015 and deliver a stiff rebuke to Ajit Pai and other Republican members of the FCC. It would also prevent the agency from passing a similar measure in the future, all but guaranteeing Net Neutrality is permanently preserved. Right now the resolution has the support of all 49 Democrats in the Senate and one Republican, Susan Collins of Maine. But Schumer and the rest of the caucus will have to win over one more Republican vote to prevent Vice President Mike Pence from breaking tie and allowing the repeal to stand. Under the Congressional Review Act, the Senate has 60 days to challenge a decision by an independent agency like the FCC. Democrats have less than 30 days to convince a "moderate" like John McCain or Lindsey Graham to buck their party. Further reading: The Washington Post (paywalled)

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DXC execs: Here's ANOTHER deadline for skills profiling

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 12:58
Staff got until 26 January to load bullets on employment gun

DXC Technologies' employees still reluctant to upload their "skill profile" onto a company database they fear will be used in the next big redundancy rounds yesterday got a ticking off from top brass.…

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Frenchman comes eye to eye with horror toilet python

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 12:27
'I could very well have been bitten in a sensitive place, if you know what I mean'

A lucky Frenchman has narrowly avoided having his todger bitten by a python that crawled up his U-bend.…

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New Mirai botnet species 'Okiru' hunts for ARC-based kit

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 11:56
Researchers: Code designed to hit Linux devices

A new variant of the notorious Mirai malware is exploiting kit with ARC processors.…

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Amount of pixels needed to make VR less crap may set your PC on fire

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 11:02
Wow, this is incredib- BLEEUUURGHGHGH

Put on a virtual reality headset and it's hard to believe that your visual system is being stretched beyond its limit. Individual pixels are still visible and the narrow field of view makes it feel like you're wearing ski googles.…

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Causes of software development woes

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 10:26
Reg readers point the finger at ambiguous requirements

Research "Agile development" can mean different things to different people. To some it's about easing up on traditional rigour, and even legitimising a quick-and-dirty approach to getting stuff out of the door. To others it's about implementing a different kind of rigour, in order to bust project backlogs in a more robust manner, and generally keep up with constantly changing business demands.…

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Is Pop Music Becoming Louder, Simpler and More Repetitive?

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 10:00
dryriver writes: The BBC has posted a very interesting article that investigates whether people claiming all over the internet that "pop music just isn't what it used to be" are simply growing old, or if there actually is objective science capable of backing up this claim of a "steady decline in music quality." The findings from five different studies are quoted; the findings from the fourth study is especially striking: 1. Pop music has become slower -- in tempo -- in recent years and also "sadder" and less "fun" to listen to. 2. Pop music has become melodically less complex, using fewer chord changes, and pop recordings are mastered to sound consistently louder (and therefore less dynamic) at a rate of around one decibel every eight years. 3. There has been a significant increase in the use of the first-person word "I" in pop song lyrics, and a decline in words that emphasize society or community. Lyrics also contain more words that can be associated with anger or anti-social sentiments. 4. 42% of people polled on which decade has produced the worst pop music since the 1970s voted for the 2010s. These people were not from a particular aging demographic at all -- all age groups polled, including 18-29 year olds, appear to feel unanimously that the 2010s are when pop music became worst. This may explain a rising trend of young millennials, for example, digging around for now 15-30 year-old music on YouTube frequently. It's not just the older people who listen to the 1980s and 1990s on YouTube and other streaming services it seems -- much younger people do it too. 5. A researcher put 15,000 Billboard Hot 100 song lyrics through the well-known Lev-Zimpel-Vogt (LZV1) data compression algorithm, which is good at finding repetitions in data. He found that songs have steadily become more repetitive over the years, and that song lyrics from today compress 22% better on average than less repetitive song lyrics from the 1960s. The most repetitive year in song lyrics was 2014 in this study. Conclusion: There is some scientific evidence backing the widely voiced complaint -- on the internet in particular -- that pop music is getting worse and worse in the 2000s and the 2010s. The music is slower, melodically simpler, louder, more repetitive, more "I" (first-person) focused, and more angry with anti-social sentiments. The 2010s got by far the most music quality down votes with 42% from people polled on which decade has produced the worst music since the 1970s.

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Hey Europe, your apathetic IT spending is ruining it for everyone

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 09:55
Gartner predicts buyers ready to splash 4.5% more cash globally in 2018

Listless IT spend in Europe is dragging down the pace of global recovery, according to the latest prediction from entrail-prodders Gartner.…

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Capita military recruiting system has 'glitches' admits minister

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 09:29
DRS still letting the armed forces down big-time

A defence minister has told Parliament that Capita’s pisspoor Defence Recruiting System (DRS) has “glitches”, following reports from The Register giving a glimpse inside the shambolic system.…

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Veeam buys AWS EC2 instance backup and recovery biz

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 08:57
Swallows N2WS so it can stick oar deeper in Amazon cloud

Veeam has announced the acquisition of N2WS, an IaaS startup, whose board includes Veeam co-founder and President Ratmir Timashev, for $42.5mn cash.…

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ServiceNow unleashes its 'Kingston' release

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 08:04
Company's journey from the heart of IT to the rest of the business continues

ServiceNow has slipped into 2018 by slipping out a new release of its platform.…

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The James Webb Space Telescope Has Emerged From the Freezer

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 07:00
The James Webb Space Telescope has emerged from a large vacuum chamber that was home to temperatures of just 20 degrees Celsius above absolute zero. Scientists have reviewed the data and given the instrument a clean bill of health. "We now have verified that NASA and its partners have an outstanding telescope and set of science instruments," said Bill Ochs, the Webb telescope project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "We are marching toward launch." Ars Technica reports: The $10 billion telescope underwent tests inside Chamber A at Johnson Space Center, which was built in 1965 to conduct thermal-vacuum testing on the Apollo command and service modules. Beginning in mid-July, after the telescope was cooled down to a temperature range of 20 to 40 Kelvin, engineers tested the alignment of Webb's 18 primary mirror segments to ensure they would act as a single, 6.5-meter telescope. (They did). Later, they assessed the fine guidance system of the telescope by simulating the light of a distant star. The Webb telescope was able to detect the light, and all of the optical systems were able to process it. Then, the telescope was able to track the "star" and its movement, giving scientists confidence that the Webb instrument will work once in space. Webb still has a ways to go before it launches. Now that project scientists know that the optic portion of the instrument can withstand the vacuum of space, and the low temperatures at the Earth-Sun L2 point it will orbit in deep space, they must perform additional testing before a probable launch next year.

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Airbus warns it could quit A380 production

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 06:57
Needs to make six to eight a year, predicts it can get back to 25 a year once airlines wake up

Airbus has reported its most prolific year to date in terms of deliveries, but also warned that it needs a new buyer of its flagship A380 if it is to continue production.…

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Drone perves defeated by tinfoil houses

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 06:02
Boffins figure out when drones are watching, without decrypting the video stream

If a drone-creeper is snooping on you, you could catch them by grabbing the video stream – but what if it's encrypted?…

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Developer plots server virtualization comeback for XenServer

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 05:03
Plans open source revival of XCP, to go places Citrix won’t

Moves are afoot to revive Xen Cloud Platform (XCP), the open source version of XenServer that existed independently of Citrix before the company released its code to the Xen Project and made its own efforts open source.…

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China's first space station to - ahem - de-orbit in late March

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-01-16 04:01
Tiangong-1 is out of control and can't keep it up any more

Predictions are firming up for when China's Tiangong-1 spacecraft will make its final re-entry-crash-and-burn.…

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Why You Shouldn't Stifle Your Sneeze

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: In a season where colds are rife, holding your nose and closing your mouth might seem like a considerate alternative to an explosive "Achoo!" But doctors have warned of the dangers of such a move after a man was found to have ruptured the back of his throat when attempting to stifle a sneeze. Medics say the incident, which they detail in the British Medical Journal Case Reports, came to light when a 34-year old man arrived in A&E with a change to his voice, a swollen neck, pain when swallowing and a popping sensation in his neck after he pinched his nose to contain an expulsion. The team took scans of the man's neck to investigate and discovered bubbles of air in the tissues at the back of the throat, and in the neck from the base of the skull to halfway down the man's back. That, they say, suggested a tear had occurred at the back of the throat as a result of increased pressure from the stifled sneeze, leading to air collecting in his soft tissues. The authors warn that blocking the nostrils and mouth when sneezing is dangerous, noting that while tearing of the throat tissue is rare, it could result in a ruptured eardrum or even a brain aneurysm.

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SpaceX and Boeing Slated For Manned Space Missions By Year's End

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-01-16 02:45
schwit1 shares a report from Fortune, covering NASA's announcement last week that it expects SpaceX to conduct a crewed test flight by the end of the year: SpaceX's crewed test flight is slated for December, after an uncrewed flight in August. Boeing will also be demonstrating its CST-100 Starliner capsule, with a crewed flight in November following an uncrewed flight in August. NASA's goal is to launch crews to the ISS from U.S. soil, a task that has fallen to Russia's space program since the retirement of the U.S. Space Shuttle program in 2011. NASA began looking for private launch companies to take over starting in 2010, and contracted both SpaceX and Boeing in 2014 to pursue crewed launches. The push to restore America's crewed spaceflight capacity has been delayed in part, according to a detailed survey by Ars Technica, by Congress redirecting funds in subsequent years. The test flights could determine whether Boeing or SpaceX conducts the first U.S. commercial space launch to the ISS. Whichever company gets that honor may also claim a symbolic U.S. flag stuck to a hatch on the space station. Sources speaking to Ars describe the race between the two companies as too close to call, and say that a push to early 2019 is entirely possible. But in an apparent vote of confidence, NASA has already begun naming astronauts to helm the flights.

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