Linux fréttir

Super Micro crams 36 Samsung 'ruler' SSDs into dense superserver

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 17:05
Watch out Intel, there's a new mini-ruler in town

Analysis Super Micro has a supernaturally dense thin server with up to half a petabyte of flash using unannounced Samsung SSDs.…

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Cryptocurrency Traders in South Korea Face Fines For Virtual Accounts

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 16:47
An anonymous reader shares a report: Cryptocurrency investors in South Korea will be fined for refusing to convert their virtual accounts into real-name ones, financial authorities said Sunday. The move comes as South Korea is scrambling to rein in the virtual currency frenzy in Asia's fourth-largest economy, including preparations for a bill to ban cryptocurrency exchanges at home. According to the authorities, cryptocurrency traders will be allowed to convert their virtual accounts into real-name ones within this month, but those who refuse to accede to real-name identification will face fines.

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Ford giving 'leccy car investment a jolt to the tune of $11 BEEELLION

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 16:32
Detroit giant plans 40 full and hybrid models by 2022

American auto enormity Ford will increase its investment in electric vehicles to $11bn (£7.97bn) in the next five years, it announced yesterday at the North American International Auto Show.…

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India To Add Facial Authentication For Its Aadhaar Card Security

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 16:12
India will build facial recognition into its national identity card in addition to fingerprints after a series of breaches in the world's biggest biometric identification programme, the government said on Monday. From a report: A local newspaper reported this month that access to the "Aadhaar" database which has identity details of more than 1 billion citizens was being sold for just $8 on social media. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), which issues the identity cards, said it would add face recognition software as an additional layer of security from July. Card holders will be required to match their photographs with that stored in the data base for authentication in addition to fingerprints and iris scans, the agency said in a statement.

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Taxman has domain typo-squatter stripped of HMRC web addresses

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 16:06
Panama corporation owns nearly 54,000 dot-UK sites

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has insisted on having a Panama company trading as the “Whois Foundation” formally stripped of a handful of dodgy web domains, even though the firm instantly offered to hand them over when challenged.…

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Why Uber Can Find You but 911 Can't

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 15:32
Accurate location data is on smartphones, so why don't more wireless carriers use it to locate emergency callers? From a report, shared by a reader: Software on Apple's iPhones and Google's Android smartphones help mobile apps like Uber and Facebook to pinpoint a user's location, making it possible to order a car, check in at a local restaurant or receive targeted advertising. But 911, with a far more pressing purpose, is stuck in the past. U.S. regulators estimate as many as 10,000 lives could be saved each year if the 911 emergency dispatching system were able to get to callers one minute faster. Better technology would be especially helpful, regulators say, when a caller can't speak or identify his or her location. After years of pressure, wireless carriers and Silicon Valley companies are finally starting to work together to solve the problem. But progress has been slow. Roughly 80% of the 240 million calls to 911 each year are made using cellphones, according to a trade group that represents first responders. For landlines, the system shows a telephone's exact address. But it can register only an estimated location, sometimes hundreds of yards wide, from a cellphone call. That frustration is now a frequent source of tension during 911 calls, said Colleen Eyman, who oversees 911 services in Arvada, Colo., just outside Denver.

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Microsoft wants to patent mind control

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 15:28
Battling Zuck for the brain computer interface

Microsoft has applied to patent a brain control interface, so you'll be able to "think" your way around a computer device, hands free.…

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Vendors: Don't sweat over Spectre, Meltdown SANitation

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 15:05
Debate rages on software, HCI slowdown though

Analysis Several SAN suppliers have said their systems don't need patching against the Spectre and Meltdown bugs. We asked Dell and Pure Storage about the impact of fixes and whether their SANs and Dell's hyperconverged (HCI) systems needed patching.…

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Vendors: Don't sweat over Spectre, Meltdown SANitation

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 15:05
Debate rages on software, HCI slowdown though

Analysis Several SAN suppliers have said their systems don't need patching against the Spectre and Meltdown bugs. We asked Dell and Pure Storage about the impact of fixes and whether their SANs and Dell's hyperconverged (HCI) systems needed patching.…

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AI Beats Humans at Reading Comprehension

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 14:55
In what is being called a landmark moment for natural language processing, Alibaba and Microsoft have developed AIs that can outperform humans on a reading and comprehension test. From a report: Alibaba Group put its deep neural network model through its paces last week, asking the AI to provide exact answers to more than 100,000 questions comprising a quiz that's considered one of the world's most authoritative machine-reading gauges. The model developed by Alibaba's Institute of Data Science of Technologies scored 82.44, edging past the 82.304 that rival humans achieved. Alibaba said it's the first time a machine has out-done a real person in such a contest. Microsoft achieved a similar feat, scoring 82.650 on the same test, but those results were finalized a day after Alibaba's, the company said.

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220 heads to roll as Steria hacks away at UK.gov back-office IT biz

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 14:28
Part of major shake-up at Frenchy outsourcer

Frenchy outsourcer Sopra Steria plans to make 220 folk redundant from its UK government business as part of a major upheaval of its public sector operation.…

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The Tech Failings of Hawaii's Missile Alert

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 14:10
Over the weekend, Hawaii incorrectly warned citizens of a missile attack via their phones. According to The Washington Post, the error was a result of a staffer picking the wrong option -- missile alert instead of test missile alert -- from a drop down software menu. Hawaiian officials say they have already changed protocols to avoid a repeat of the scenario. The report goes on to add: Part of what worsened the situation Saturday was that there was no system in place at the state emergency agency for correcting the error, HEMA (Hawaii Emergency Management Agency) spokesman Richard Rapoza said. The state agency had standing permission through FEMA to use civil warning systems to send out the missile alert -- but not to send out a subsequent false alarm alert, he said. Though the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency posted a follow-up tweet at 8:20 a.m. saying there was "NO missile threat," it wouldn't be until 8:45 a.m. that a subsequent cellphone alert was sent telling people to stand down. Motherboard notes that new regulations require telecom companies to offer a testing system for local and state alert originators, but because of lobbying by Verizon and CTIA, this specific regulation does not go into effect until March 2019. In a piece, The Atlantic argues that the 90-character messages sent by the system aren't suited to the way we use our devices.

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Facebook settles landmark revenge smut case with UK teen for undisclosed sum

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 13:52
Anti-saucy snap programme makes more sense

Facebook has settled a case with a 14-year-old girl after the social network hosted revealing pictures of her on a Facebook "shame" page.…

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Customers reporting credit card fraud after using OnePlus webstore

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 13:16
Chinese mobe-flinger probing the issue

A large number of OnePlus customers claim to have been hit by fraudulent credit card transactions after making purchases on the phone company's site. And they're unhappy that the company has been slow to address the issue.…

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Users clutch refilled Box boxen after 'empty' folder panic

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 12:35
Customers couldn't see sync 'n' share files

Business user file sync and sharer Box "sank" for some users late last week, who took to forums and social media complaining they could not see any of their files.…

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Which JavaScript Framework is the Most Popular?

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 12:34
An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld's report on which JavaScript frameworks are the most widely-used: In a study of 28-day download cycles for front-end JavaScript frameworks, NPM, which oversees the popular JavaScript package registry, found that React has been on a steady upward trajectory; it now accounts for about 0.05 percent of the registry's 13 billion downloads per month as of the fourth quarter of 2017. Web developers as well as desktop and mobile developers are adopting the library and it has spawned an ecosystem of related packages. Preact, a lightweight alternative to React, also has seen growth and could become a force in the future. On the down side, Backbone, which accounted for almost 0.1 percent of all downloads in 2013, now comprises only about 0.005 percent of downloads (about 750,000 per month). Backbone has declined steeply but is kept afloat by the long shelf life of projects using it, NPM reasoned. The jQuery JavaScript library also remains popular but has experienced decreasing interest. Angular, the Google-developed JavaScript framework, was the second-most-popular framework behind React, when combining the original Angular 1.x with the rewritten Angular 2.x. Version 1.x was at about 0.0125 percent of downloads last month while version 2.x was at about 0.02 percent. Still, Angular as a whole is showing just modest growth. They also report that the four JavaScript frameworks with the fastest growth rates for 2017 were Preact, Vue, React, and Ember. But for back end services written in JavaScript, npm reports that Express "is the overwhelmingly dominant solution... The next four biggest frameworks are so small relative to Express that it's hard to even see them."

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Childcare is a pain in the bum and so is HMRC's buggy subsidies site

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 12:05
Thousands still experiencing issues since April launch

More than 6,000 parents looking to access financial help with childcare have had difficulties with using HM Revenue and Customs' frequently broken Childcare Choices website.…

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Facebook, Twitter supremos ditch Disney as biz steps on their turf

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 10:45
Tech bigwigs won't seek re-election to Mickey Mouse board

The Walt Disney Company's increasing interest in moving its shows online has forced two Silicon Valley supremos to leave the board.…

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UK.gov denies data processing framework is 'sinister' – but admits ICO has concerns

TheRegister - Mon, 2018-01-15 10:18
Minister says commish is 'free to disregard' framework if it is 'irrelevant'

The government has moved to allay fears over amendments to the Data Protection Bill that critics say could undermine both the law and the powers of the UK’s privacy watchdog.…

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'Don't Fear the Robopocalypse': the Case for Autonomous Weapons

Slashdot - Mon, 2018-01-15 09:39
Lasrick shares "Don't fear the robopocalypse," an interview from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists with the former Army Ranger who led the team that established the U.S. Defense Department policy on autonomous weapons (and has written the upcoming book Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War). Paul Scharre makes the case for uninhabited vehicles, robot teammates, and maybe even an outer perimeter of robotic sentries (and, for mobile troops, "a cloud of air and ground robotic systems"). But he also argues that "In general, we should strive to keep humans involved in the lethal force decision-making process as much as is feasible. What exactly that looks like in practice, I honestly don't know." So does that mean he thinks we'll eventually see the deployment of fully autonomous weapons in combat? I think it's very hard to imagine a world where you physically take the capacity out of the hands of rogue regimes... The technology is so ubiquitous that a reasonably competent programmer could build a crude autonomous weapon in their garage. The idea of putting some kind of nonproliferation regime in place that actually keeps the underlying technology out of the hands of people -- it just seems really naive and not very realistic. I think in that kind of world, you have to anticipate that there are, at a minimum, going to be uses by terrorists and rogue regimes. I think it's more of an open question whether we cross the threshold into a world where nation-states are using them on a large scale. And if so, I think it's worth asking, what do we mean by"them"? What degree of autonomy? There are automated defensive systems that I would characterize as human-supervised autonomous weapons -- where a human is on the loop and supervising its operation -- in use by at least 30 countries today. They've been in use for decades and really seem to have not brought about the robopocalypse or anything. I'm not sure that those [systems] are particularly problematic. In fact, one could see them as being even more beneficial and valuable in an age when things like robot swarming and cooperative autonomy become more possible.

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