Linux fréttir

Most Amazon Brands Are Duds, Not Disrupters, Study Finds

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 18:20
An anonymous reader shares a report: The explosion of Amazon's private-label products -- batteries, baby wipes, jeans, tortilla chips, sofas -- has prompted concern that the world's biggest online retailer could use its clout to promote these house brands at the expense of merchants selling similar products on the web store. The issue even surfaced in Senator Elizabeth Warren's recent proposal to break up big technology companies. Turns out most Amazon-branded goods are flops that don't threaten other businesses at all, according to Marketplace Pulse. In a study, the New York e-commerce research firm examined 23,000 products and found that shoppers aren't more inclined to buy Amazon brands even when the company elevates them in search results. The study suggests popular political and media narratives about Amazon's market power are overblown, despite the company capturing 52.4 percent of all online spending in the U.S. this year, according to EMarketer. The study used sales rankings and the number of customer reviews as indicators of sales volume for different products, including Amazon's own brands and brands sold exclusively on the site. Amazon's success has been limited to basic products like batteries where shoppers are inclined to seek generic alternatives to save money, the study found. But when competing against such categories as apparel, where household names have an entrenched position, such Amazon brands as "A for Awesome" children's wear don't stand out, the study found.

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Flawed Analysis, Failed Oversight: How Boeing, FAA Certified the Suspect 737 MAX Flight Control System

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 17:30
In one of the most detailed descriptions yet of the relationship between Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration during the 737 Max's certification process, the Seattle Times reports that the U.S. regulator delegated much of the safety assessment to Boeing and that the analysis the planemaker in turn delivered to the authorities had crucial flaws. 0x2A shares the report: Both Boeing and the FAA were informed of the specifics of this story and were asked for responses 11 days ago, before the second crash of a 737 MAX. [...] Several technical experts inside the FAA said October's Lion Air crash, where the MCAS (Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System) has been clearly implicated by investigators in Indonesia, is only the latest indicator that the agency's delegation of airplane certification has gone too far, and that it's inappropriate for Boeing employees to have so much authority over safety analyses of Boeing jets. "We need to make sure the FAA is much more engaged in failure assessments and the assumptions that go into them," said one FAA safety engineer. Going against a long Boeing tradition of giving the pilot complete control of the aircraft, the MAX's new MCAS automatic flight control system was designed to act in the background, without pilot input. It was needed because the MAX's much larger engines had to be placed farther forward on the wing, changing the airframe's aerodynamic lift. Designed to activate automatically only in the extreme flight situation of a high-speed stall, this extra kick downward of the nose would make the plane feel the same to a pilot as the older-model 737s. Boeing engineers authorized to work on behalf of the FAA developed the System Safety Analysis for MCAS, a document which in turn was shared with foreign air-safety regulators in Europe, Canada and elsewhere in the world. The document, "developed to ensure the safe operation of the 737 MAX," concluded that the system complied with all applicable FAA regulations. Yet black box data retrieved after the Lion Air crash indicates that a single faulty sensor -- a vane on the outside of the fuselage that measures the plane's "angle of attack," the angle between the airflow and the wing -- triggered MCAS multiple times during the deadly flight, initiating a tug of war as the system repeatedly pushed the nose of the plane down and the pilots wrestled with the controls to pull it back up, before the final crash. [...] On the Lion Air flight, when the MCAS pushed the jet's nose down, the captain pulled it back up, using thumb switches on the control column. Still operating under the false angle-of-attack reading, MCAS kicked in each time to swivel the horizontal tail and push the nose down again. The black box data released in the preliminary investigation report shows that after this cycle repeated 21 times, the plane's captain ceded control to the first officer. As MCAS pushed the nose down two or three times more, the first officer responded with only two short flicks of the thumb switches. At a limit of 2.5 degrees, two cycles of MCAS without correction would have been enough to reach the maximum nose-down effect. In the final seconds, the black box data shows the captain resumed control and pulled back up with high force. But it was too late. The plane dived into the sea at more than 500 miles per hour. [...] The former Boeing flight controls engineer who worked on the MAX's certification on behalf of the FAA said that whether a system on a jet can rely on one sensor input, or must have two, is driven by the failure classification in the system safety analysis. He said virtually all equipment on any commercial airplane, including the various sensors, is reliable enough to meet the "major failure" requirement, which is that the probability of a failure must be less than one in 100,000. Such systems are therefore typically allowed to rely on a single input sensor.

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Apple Announces 10.5-inch iPad Air and Refreshed iPad Mini

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 16:40
Ahead of a planned event next week, Apple today unveiled two new iPads. From a report: The new, larger, 10.5-inch iPad Air will arrive with a 70 percent performance boost compared to its predecessor, thanks to the company's A12 Bionic chip with Apple's Neural Engine. That'll be useful alongside the now 20-percent larger display -- which is compatible with the first-gen Apple Pencil too. A new iPad Mini has been a long time coming. The 7.9-inch option will, barring screen size, match the Air on specs. The screen is also 25 percent brighter versus old iPad minis, and will also support Apple Pencil -- the tiniest model to do so. Both new iPads have a laminated display that brings the surface glass and screen closer together to improve visibility -- and making them at least a little more desirable than Apple's entry-level iPad. Neither has FaceID built-in, it seems. Look, there's that Home button. The new iPad mini starts at $399 for the Wi-Fi model and $529 for the variant that includes cellular support. The new iPad Air starts at $499 for Wi-Fi, and $629 for Wi-Fi and cellular model.

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This headline is proudly brought to you by wired keyboards: Wireless Fujitsu model hacked

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 16:39
If you have an LX901, you are at risk of mild embuggerance

A German security researcher has revealed that one model of Fujitsu wireless keyboard will accept unauthenticated input, despite the presence of AES-128 encryption.…

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Meteor Blast Over Bering Sea Was 10 Times Size of Hiroshima

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 16:10
A meteor explosion over the Bering Sea late last year unleashed 10 times as much energy as the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, scientists have revealed. From a report: The fireball tore across the sky off Russia's Kamchatka peninsula on 18 December and released energy equivalent to 173 kilotons of TNT. It was the largest air blast since another meteor hurtled into the atmosphere over Chelyabinsk, in Russia's south-west, six years ago, and the second largest in the past 30 years. Unlike the Chelyabinsk meteor, which was captured on CCTV, mobile phones and car dashboard cameras, the December arrival from outer space went largely unnoticed at the time because it exploded in such a remote location. Nasa received information about the blast from the US air force after military satellites detected visible and infrared light from the fireball in December. Lindley Johnson, a planetary defense officer at Nasa, told BBC News that blasts of this size were expected only two or three times a century. The space agency's analysis shows that the meteor, probably a few metres wide, barrelled into Earth's atmosphere at 72,000mph and exploded at an altitude of 16 miles. The blast released about 40% of the energy of the meteor explosion over Chelyabinsk, according to Kelly Fast, Nasa's near-Earth objects observations programme manager, who spoke at the 50th Lunar and Planetary Science conference near Houston.

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Apple bestows first hardware upgrades in years upon neglected iPad Mini and Air lines

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 16:05
And a stylus! But goes without saying that it ain't cheap

Apple has tinkered with its iPad line, resurrecting the Air and administering a bit of mouth-to-mouth to the Mini as the company battles tottering sales.…

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Slack Hands Over Control of Encryption Keys To Regulated Customers

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 15:30
Business communications and collaboration service Slack said today that it is launching Enterprise Key Management (EKM) for Slack, a new tool that enables customers to control their encryption keys in the enterprise version of the communications app. The keys are managed in the AWS KMS key management tool. From a report: Geoff Belknap, chief security officer (CSO) at Slack, says that the new tool should appeal to customers in regulated industries, who might need tighter control over security. "Markets like financial services, health care and government are typically underserved in terms of which collaboration tools they can use, so we wanted to design an experience that catered to their particular security needs," Belknap told TechCrunch. Slack currently encrypts data in transit and at rest, but the new tool augments this by giving customers greater control over the encryption keys that Slack uses to encrypt messages and files being shared inside the app. He said that regulated industries in particular have been requesting the ability to control their own encryption keys including the ability to revoke them if it was required for security reasons. "EKM is a key requirement for growing enterprise companies of all sizes, and was a requested feature from many of our Enterprise Grid customers. We wanted to give these customers full control over their encryption keys, and when or if they want to revoke them," he said. Further reading: Slack Doesn't Have End-to-End Encryption Because Your Boss Doesn't Want It.

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UK libraries dumped 11% of computers since 2010-11... everybody has one anyway, right?

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 15:07
Fears for vulnerable amid mass migration to online services

Almost 4,000 computers have been cut from public libraries in England since 2010, with some 680 internet-connected machines lost in the past year.…

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Amazon is Introducing Private Investors To High-Risk Startups in a New Pilot Program

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 14:45
Amazon is testing a new way to bolster its relationship with startups and possibly bring in more capital to the ecosystem. From a report: The fledgling effort, known as the Amazon Web Services Pro-Rata Program, is designed to link private investors with companies that use AWS, as well as venture funds whose portfolios are filled with potential cloud customers. Amazon is not investing money through the program. The Pro-Rata program is being run by Brad Holden, a former partner at TomorrowVentures (founded by ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt), and Jason Hunt, who are both part of AWS's business development team focused on angel and seed relationships, according to an email they sent to investors in January. "The Pro-Rata Program is a new pilot intended to connect family offices and venture capitalists for specific investment opportunities from the AWS ecosystem," according to the email, which was viewed by CNBC. "Pro rata" refers to the rights investors have to put money in subsequent rounds. Mike Isaac, a reporter at The New York Times, writes, "If Amazon is using its direct knowledge of startups' health based on the fact that Amazon literally owns and operates the servers, how is this at all ethical? If that's not the case, Amazon should make that crystal clear (even though i'd have a hard time believing it). It's like Facebook's years of insights into [various] apps' data with the Onavo team, only instead of ripping companies off (which FB did), they invested in them."

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Public disgrace: 82% of EU govt websites stalked by Google adtech cookies – report

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 14:22
Plus: UK health service sites contain commercial trackers

All but three of the European Union member states' government websites are littered with undisclosed adtech trackers from Google and other firms, with many piggy-backing on third-party scripts, according to an analysis of almost 200,000 webpages.…

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MySpace Has Reportedly Lost All Photos, Videos and Songs Uploaded Over 12 Years Due To Data Corruption During a Server Migration Project

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 14:06
MySpace may have lost your digital memories in a server migration. From a report: "As a result of a server migration project, any photos, videos, and audio files you uploaded more than three years ago may no longer be available on or from Myspace," it said in a note at the top of the site. "We apologize for the inconvenience. If you would like more information, please contact our Data Protection Officer at DPO@myspace.com." Andy Baio, one of the people behind Kickstarter, tweeted that it could mean millions of songs uploaded between the site's Aug. 1, 2003 launch and 2015 are gone for good. "Myspace accidentally lost all the music uploaded from its first 12 years in a server migration, losing over 50 million songs from 14 million artists," he wrote Sunday. "I'm deeply skeptical this was an accident. Flagrant incompetence may be bad PR, but it still sounds better than 'we can't be bothered with the effort and cost of migrating and hosting 50 million old MP3s,' " Baio noted.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Lone staffer killed our shields, claims etailer Gearbest after infosec bods peep at user deets

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 13:40
Whether it's 1.5m or 280k exposed, it's not a great look

Researchers working for VPNMentor have accused Chinese e-commerce site Gearbest of storing user information in "completely unsecured" Elasticsearch databases after discovering "1.5 million records" which they were able to access through a browser.…

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That's Huawei I like it: Firm's cloudy arm dumps 19-inch rack for newer model

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 12:49
All future cloud data centres to be designed with 21-inch Open Rack in mind

Embattled Chinese electronics giant Huawei said it will design all of its upcoming public cloud data centres around the 21-inch Open Rack standard developed by the Open Compute Project.…

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UKCloud hauls Cisco reported 10% stake as biz tries to convince IT punters to buy British

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 12:22
The Phil Collins-approved farmers' market of cloud computing

UKCloud today sucked up £25m in funding from Cisco-backed Digital Alpha Advisors for a 10 per cent stake in a business battling to convince buyers to use national rather than multinational cloud bringers.…

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Oracle's long-running pension plan class action case: C'mon, judge, reject a jury trial – Big Red

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 11:45
Wants court to decide on accusations it failed to properly police pension investments

Oracle is fighting back against tens of thousands of former staffers with pension plans who want to take the firm to a jury trial.…

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Astronomers Discover 83 Supermassive Black Holes at the Edge of the Universe

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-03-18 11:34
"A team of international astronomers have been hunting for ancient, supermassive black holes -- and they've hit the motherlode, discovering 83 previously unknown quasars," reports CNET: The Japanese team turned the ultra-powerful "Hyper Suprime-Cam", mounted to the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, toward the cosmos' darkest corners, surveying the sky over a period of five years. By studying the snapshots, they've been able to pick potential quasar candidates out of the dark. Notably, their method of probing populations of supermassive black holes that are similar in size to the ones we see in today's universe, has given us a window into their origins. After identifying 83 potential candidates, the team used a suite of international telescopes to confirm their findings. The quasars they've plucked out are from the very early universe, about 13 billion light years away. Practically, that means the researchers are looking into the past, at objects form less than a billion years after the Big Bang. "It is remarkable that such massive dense objects were able to form so soon after the Big Bang," said Michael Strauss, who co-authored the paper, in a press release. Scientists aren't sure how black holes formed in the early universe, so being able to detect them this far back in time provides new avenues of exploration.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Whitepaper: Should you outsource your IT service desk? Check out this free practical guide

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 11:04
Comarch tells you everything you need to know

Promo If you have ever worried about the cost and staffing burden of providing your customers with the increasing amount of IT support they may need at all hours of the day or night, outsourcing your service desk may be the answer you are looking for.…

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Apple: Group FaceTime allows up to 32 people! Skype: Hold my beer

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 10:42
Plus: Builds, Teams, a bit of Xbox and other things Microsoft fiddled with last week

Roundup It has been a bumper week at Microsoft with new builds, bigger meetings and streaming software.…

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Do Martians dream of electric Nimbys? Selling 5G needs steak, not just sizzle

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 10:04
Let's talk about specs baby, let's talk about real 5G

Comment Executive editor Andrew Orlowski was invited to share his thoughts on challenges to the uptake of 5G at a Westminster Forum event on Thursday 14 March. This is what he told the panel.

Categories: Linux fréttir

What made a super high-tech home in Victorian England? Hydroelectic witchery, for starters

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-03-18 09:05
Forget the scones and gardens, Cragside house is engineery

Geek's Guide to Britain Imagine an ageing magnate in his private retreat, and you might picture English industrialist William – first Baron – Armstrong in the luxurious wood-panelled library of his Northumberland pile: Cragside.…

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