Linux fréttir

Intel Unveils the Thunderbolt 4 Spec, Debuting in PCs in the Fall

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 14:41
Intel unveiled Thunderbolt 4 on Wednesday, the next iteration of the I/O specification that provides a high-speed peripheral bus to docks, displays, external storage and eGPUs for PCs. Rather than increase the available bandwidth, however, Thunderbolt 4 provides more clarity and helps create new categories of products. From a report: Thunderbolt 4 will debut later this year as part of Intel's "Tiger Lake" CPU platform, as Intel originally announced during CES in January. We now know it will support 40Gbps throughput, but with tighter minimum specs. Thunderbolt 4 will guarantee that a pair of 4K displays will work with a Thunderbolt dock, and require Thunderbolt 4-equipped PCs to charge on at least one Thunderbolt port. Thunderbolt PCs will be able to connect to either "compact" or "full" docks with up to four Thunderbolt ports. Longer Thunderbolt cables will be possible, too. One thing that doesn't seem to be changing is Thunderbolt's exclusivity. Intel developed Thunderbolt, and perhaps not coincidentally, OEM systems based on rival AMD's CPUs have never had this technology. While AMD has officially dismissed the need for Thunderbolt, with generation 4 Intel appears to have made it even harder for AMD to get it, even if it wanted to. Intel's still pitching Thunderbolt as a single standard to rule them all, but the reality up to now has been complicated. You still have to squint hard at that USB-C-shaped port to determine which of the multitude of USB specifications it meets, including whether it's a USB4 connection that happens to support Thunderbolt. To muddy things further, Thunderbolt also encompasses PCIe, DisplayPort, and USB Power Delivery standards.

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Don't make any sudden moves: Huawei urges UK government to wait before declaring it 'unreliable'

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 14:30
Claims 'restrictions by the US will take months to fully understand'

Embattled Chinese tech bogeyman Huawei has decried the UK government's mooted plan to ban it from domestic 5G networks over reliability concerns caused by the imposition of punishing US sanctions.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Linux Company SUSE Outbids Competitors for Fast-growing Startup Rancher Labs

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 14:07
SUSE, a Linux distribution company controlled by private equity firm EQT, has agreed to acquire Rancher Labs, a start-up with technology that helps organizations run software in virtual containers across many servers. From a report: The companies announced the deal Wednesday but didn't disclose the terms. Two people familiar with the deal said SUSE is paying $600 million to $700 million. The transaction suggests that even during a recession, demand remains high for technology that can enable companies to operate more efficiently. Talks between the companies began in the spring, and the process became competitive with additional bids, Ursheet Parikh, a partner at Rancher backer Mayfield Fund, told CNBC on Tuesday. There were "lots of Zoom calls," Parikh said. In the past few years, with the rise of start-ups such as Docker, containers became a trendy alternative to more traditional virtualization technology for running applications on each computer server in a company data center. Amazon, Microsoft and other cloud providers came out with services that developers can use to place code in containers, and in 2017 SUSE introduced its own service for managing containers. The companies haven't finalized integration plans as the deal still faces regulatory approval.

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UK advertising watchdog raps ruler on O2's hand over misleading ads for iPad and Surface Pro deals

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 13:54
£9 a month mumble mumble, terms and conditions apply

The Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) has put O2 on the naughty step after it deemed two of its print adverts for the iPad and Surface Pro tablets misled customers about the overall cost.…

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You know what would look great on our database? Your machine learning model: GPUs and unstructured data on the menu for Exasol as it tries to unify BI and ML

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 12:55
Keeping up in performance stakes vital as data science sector explodes, says analyst

Exasol, the company behind a distributed in-memory database namesake, has pushed out its latest upgrade, touting support for GPUs and semi-structured data.…

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Cereal Killer Cafe enters hipster heaven, heads online: Coronavirus blamed for shutters being pulled down

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 11:58
End of milk-based monstrosity... or overpriced harmless fun? You be the judge

The hipster entrepreneur in all of us died a little bit today with confirmation that Cereal Killer Cafe, the best place in London Town for overpriced bowls of breakfast foodstuffs and milk, is not going to re-open its doors.…

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Citrix tells everyone not to worry too much over its latest security patches. NSA's former top hacker disagrees

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 10:55
Eleven flaws cleaned up including one that may be exploited to sling malware downloads

Citrix has issued patches for 11 CVE-listed security vulnerabilities in its various networking products.…

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GCHQ's cyber arm report on Huawei said to be burning hole through UK.gov desks

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 10:01
Ban, no ban, trade war, 'useful idiots'... it's a big pie and everyone's grabbing a slice

Britain is all a-tizzy about Huawei again as talk swirls over the imminent release of an unofficial report into the Chinese company’s influence over prominent Britons and a ban on its telco equipment.…

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Zoom Offering Hardware As a Service Offering

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 10:00
Zoom is teaming up with four video conferencing hardware makers to launch Zoom Hardware as a Service, designed to make Zoom Rooms and Zoom Phone more available to enterprises. ZDNet reports: The hardware providers in the package are DTEN, Neat, Poly, and Yealink. The hardware and Zoom bundles give tech buyers a monthly fixed price that varies by system and support by Zoom. Neat and DTEN have already designed hardware systems revolving around Zoom, which has become a household name with growth to match following the remote work shift during the COVID-19 pandemic. Zoom's Hardware as a Service (HaaS) pricing varies depending on hardware. For instance, Zoom Phone hardware runs from $5.99 per device for the Poly VVX 250 to $50 a month for the Yealink CP960. Zoom Hardware as a Service doesn't include software license costs. The Zoom Rooms Hardware as a Service plans are pricier than Zoom Phone options. Pricing for Zoom Rooms hardware range from the Neat.bar with Neat.Pad controller at $110 a month per device to Poly systems that range from $100 a month to $150 a month. Software licensing costs aren't included. Zoom HaaS like other as-a-service efforts provides low upfront costs and predictable budgeting as well as the ability to scale up or down and get managed support.

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Boolean bafflement at British Airways' Executive Club: Sneaky little Avioses - Wicked, Tricksy, False!

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 09:13
Curse us and crush us, my precious is lost

Bork!Bork!Bork! Welcome to another in The Register's series of public whoopsies by customer-facing IT. Today it is the turn of perennial favourite, British Airways.…

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Leaving Las Salesforce: Paul Smith fashions a new role at ServiceNow

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 08:30
No, not the Nottingham-born designer of natty suits, the former Proctor & Gamble chap who also spent time in the channel

Salesforce exec veep and UK GM Paul Smith has quit to join cloud platform rival ServiceNow in the same role but for the Europe, Middle East and Africa region.…

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Captain, the computer has identified 250 alien stars that infiltrated our galaxy – actual science, not science-fiction

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 07:18
Neural network trained to spot emigrated suns in our Milky Way uncovers mysterious Nyx collective

Deep-learning software has singled out a group of 250 stars in the Milky Way that appear to have been born outside our galaxy. That's according to a research paper published this week in Nature Astronomy.…

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WHO To Review Evidence of Airborne Transmission of Coronavirus

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 07:00
After hundreds of experts urged the World Health Organization to review mounting scientific research, the agency acknowledged on Tuesday that airborne transmission of the coronavirus may be a threat in indoor spaces. The New York Times reports: W.H.O. expert committees are going over evidence on transmission of the virus and plan to release updated recommendations in a few days, agency scientists said in a news briefing. The possibility of airborne transmission, especially in "crowded, closed, poorly ventilated settings, cannot be ruled out," said Dr. Benedetta Allegranzi, who leads the W.H.O.'s committee on infection prevention and control. She said the agency recommends "appropriate and optimal ventilation" of indoor environments, as well as physical distancing. Agency staff fielded several questions from reporters about transmission of the virus by air, prompted by an open letter from 239 experts calling on the agency to review its guidance. Many of the letter's signatories have collaborated with the W.H.O. and served on its committees. [...] W.H.O. scientists said that for the past few months, the infection prevention committee has been weighing the evidence on all the ways in which the coronavirus spreads, including by tiny droplets or aerosols. "We acknowledge that there is emerging evidence in this field, as in all other fields," Dr. Allegranzi said. "And therefore, we believe that we have to be open to this evidence and understand its implications regarding the modes of transmission and also regarding the precautions that need to be taken." It will also be important to understand the importance of transmission by aerosols compared with larger droplets, and the dose of the virus needed for infection from aerosols, she said. "These are fields that are really growing and for which there is evidence emerging, but it is not definitive," she said. "However, the evidence needs to be gathered and interpreted, and we continue to support this."

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Achieve your financial services digital transformation with advice and insight brought to you by Workday

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 06:00
Watch live online this week – and turn that existential threat into a competitive advantage

Webcast It’s been a challenging decade in the financial services sector to say the least. From the global financial crisis to environmental, social, and governance regulation, with digital transformation on top. Now the COVID-19 virus outbreak has provided the impetus to accelerate those digital transformation plans.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

High-flying Microsoft exec jumps to Magic Leap as CEO. Yes, we haven't got that the wrong way round

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 05:02
Peggy Johnson will take over after she approached ailing upstart

Augmented-reality flop Magic Leap has received an unexpected credibility boost: a top Microsoft exec has jumped ship, and will take over as CEO in August.…

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City Builds Open-Access Broadband Network With Google Fiber As Its First ISP

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Google Fiber's wireline broadband is expanding to a new city for the first time in several years as part of a public-private partnership to build an open-access network that any ISP can use to offer service. The new network will be in West Des Moines, Iowa. Google Fiber "paused" plans to expand to new cities in October 2016 amid lawsuits filed by incumbent ISPs and construction problems that eventually led to the Alphabet-owned ISP's complete exit from Louisville. But in West Des Moines, Google Fiber will rely on the city to build a network of fiber conduits. "Municipalities like West Des Moines excel at building and maintaining infrastructure. At digging and laying pipes under the roads, restoring and preserving the sidewalks and green spaces, reducing traffic congestion, and lowering construction disruption," Google Fiber said in an announcement yesterday. The West Des Moines government's announcement said that "once the City installs conduit in the public right of way, broadband providers will pay a license fee to install their fiber in the City's conduit. Google Fiber will be the first tenant in the network." A conduit-license agreement "calls for Google Fiber to cover a portion of the construction cost to build conduit... through their monthly lease payments." "On a monthly basis, Google Fiber would pay the city $2.25 for each household that connects to the network," according to the Des Moines Register. Google Fiber would pay the city a minimum of $4.5 million over 20 years. Construction is expected to begin this fall and be completed in about two and a half years, the city said. While Google Fiber is slated to be the first tenant offering fiber service over the West Des Moines network, the city is hoping to spur broadband competition by letting other ISPs install their own fiber in the conduits. Current ISPs in West Des Moines include CenturyLink and Mediacom. "Every home and business in West Des Moines is eligible for a free connection point from their property to the municipal fiber conduit," the city said. "The City will be installing these connections and will contact every business and resident in the near future to ensure everyone has the opportunity to participate." The city also said it aims to make high-speed broadband available to "all residents, regardless of their means." "West Des Moines plans to invest nearly $40 million" in the project, the Des Moines Register wrote, adding that city officials intend to "solicit bids for laying the underground conduit that would house the fiber-optic cables."

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NASA trusted 'traditional' Boeing to program its Starliner without close supervision... It failed to dock due to bugs

TheRegister - Wed, 2020-07-08 02:57
All eyes were instead on SpaceX and its newer programming techniques

At a press conference on Tuesday, NASA confirmed why Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spaceship failed to hook up with the International Space Station last year. The answer: as expected, buggy code.…

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Security Cameras Can Tell Burglars When You're Not Home, Study Shows

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 02:03
schwit1 shares a report from CNN: Some popular home security cameras could allow would-be burglars to work out when you've left the building, according to a study published Monday. Researchers found they could tell if someone was in, and even what they were doing in the home, just by looking at data uploaded by the camera and without monitoring the video footage itself. The international study was carried out by researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the Chinese Academy of Science, using data provided by a large Chinese manufacturer of Internet Protocol (IP) security cameras. Cameras like these allow users to monitor their homes remotely via a video feed on the internet, but the researchers say the traffic generated by the devices can reveal privacy-compromising information. Study author Gareth Tyson from QMUL told CNN that data uploads of the unencrypted data increase when a camera is recording something moving, so an attacker could tell if the camera was uploading footage of someone in motion, and even different types of motion like running or sitting. The risk is that "someone who is specifically targeting an individual household rocks up outside with a device to try and start passively monitoring traffic," he said. Tyson told CNN that an attacker would require a decent level of technical knowledge to monitor the data themselves, but there is a chance that someone could develop a program that does so and sell it online. Noting that he hasn't seen any direct evidence of this kind of attack taking place, he said one potential use would be if someone wanted to burgle your house. Tyson says companies could randomly inject data into their systems to make it harder for attackers to spot a pattern. The study has been published at the IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications.

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AMD Launches Ryzen 3000XT Series CPUs At Higher Clock Speeds To Battle Intel

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 01:30
MojoKid writes: Last month, AMD made its Ryzen 3000XT series processors official, after weeks of leaks and speculation. Ryzen 3000XT series processors are tweaked versions of the original 3000X series products, but with higher clocks and the ability to maintain turbo frequencies longer. Launching today, AMD's new Ryzen 5 3600XT is a 6 core/12-thread processor, with a 3.8GHz base clock and a 4.5GHz max boost clock. That's a 100MHz increase over the 3600X. The Ryzen 7 3800XT is an 8-core/16-thread processor with a base clock of 3.9GHz and a max boost clock of 4.7GHz, which is 200MHz higher than the original 3800X. Finally, the Ryzen 9 3900XT is a 12-core/24-thread processor with a base clock of 3.8GHz with a max boost clock of 4.7GHz, which is a 100MHz increase over the original Ryzen 9 3900X. AMD also notes these new processors can maintain boost frequencies for somewhat longer durations as well, which should offer an additional performance uplift, based on refinements made to the chip's 7nm manufacturing process. In testing, the new CPUs offer small performance gains over their "non-XT" namesakes, with 100MHz - 200MHz increases in boost clocks resulting in roughly 2% - 5% increases to both their single and multi-threaded performance in most workloads. Those frequency increases come at the expense of slightly higher peak power consumption as well of course. The best news may be that AMD's original Ryzen 5 3600X, Ryzen 7 3800X, and the Ryzen 9 3900X will remain in the line-up for the time being, but their prices will be slashed a bit, with the new Ryzen 5 3600XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT, and Ryzen 9 3900XT arriving with the same $249, $399, and $499 introductory prices as the originals.

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Mathematician Ronald Graham Dies At 84

Slashdot - Wed, 2020-07-08 01:09
The American Mathematical Society has announced the passing of Ronald Graham, a leader in discrete mathematics and a former president of both the AMS and the MAA. He died July 6th at the age of 84. From the report: Graham published more than 350 papers and books with many collaborators, including more than 90 with his wife, Fan Chung, and more than 30 with Paul ErdÅ's. In addition to writing articles with Paul ErdÅ's, Graham had a room in his house reserved for ErdÅ's's frequent visits, he administered the cash prizes that ErdÅ's created for various problems, and he created the ErdÅ's number, which is the collaboration distance between a mathematician and ErdÅ's. He also created Graham's number in a 1971 paper on Ramsey theory written with Bruce Rothschild, which was for a time the largest number used in a proof. Graham received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1962 under the direction of D.H. Lehmer. He worked at Bell Laboratories until 1999, starting as director of information sciences and ending his tenure there as chief scientist. Graham then joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego and later became chief scientist at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, a joint operation between the university and the University of California, Irvine. [...] Graham was an AMS member since 1961. For more information, see his "special page," these video interviews by the Simons Foundation, an audio interview about the mathematics of juggling, and his page at the MacTutor website. Graham's most recent appearance on Slashdot was in 2016, when a trio of researchers used a supercomputer to generate the largest math proof ever at 200 terabytes in size. The math problem has been named the boolean Pythagorean Triples problem and was first proposed back in the 1980's by mathematician Ronald Graham.

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