Linux fréttir

Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 06:08
Ad giant to charge for key applications amid license shakeup and antitrust fine

In an effort to placate Europe's regulators furious at its anticompetitive tactics, Google has overhauled its Android licensing practices for the continent.…

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Party like it's 1987... SVGA code bug haunts VMware's house, lets guests flee to host OS

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 05:01
Malicious code in VMs can leap over ESXi, Workstation, Fusion hypervisor security

Get busy, VMware admins and users: the virtualisation virtuoso has patched a programming blunder in ESXi, Workstation Pro and Player, and Fusion and Fusion Pro products that can be exploited by malicious code to jump from guest OS to host machine.…

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'Do Not Track,' the Privacy Tool Used By Millions of People, Doesn't Do Anything

Slashdot - Wed, 2018-10-17 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Gizmodo: When you go into the privacy settings on your browser, there's a little option there to turn on the "Do Not Track" function, which will send an invisible request on your behalf to all the websites you visit telling them not to track you. A reasonable person might think that enabling it will stop a porn site from keeping track of what she watches, or keep Facebook from collecting the addresses of all the places she visits on the internet, or prevent third-party trackers she's never heard of from following her from site to site. According to a recent survey by Forrester Research, a quarter of American adults use "Do Not Track" to protect their privacy. (Our own stats at Gizmodo Media Group show that 9% of visitors have it turned on.) We've got bad news for those millions of privacy-minded people, though: "Do Not Track" is like spray-on sunscreen, a product that makes you feel safe while doing little to actually protect you. Yahoo and Twitter initially said they would respect it, only to later abandon it. The most popular sites on the internet, from Google and Facebook to Pornhub and xHamster, never honored it in the first place. Facebook says that while it doesn't respect DNT, it does "provide multiple ways for people to control how we use their data for advertising." (That is of course only true so far as it goes, as there's some data about themselves users can't access.) From the department of irony, Google's Chrome browser offers users the ability to turn off tracking, but Google itself doesn't honor the request, a fact Google added to its support page some time in the last year. [...] "It is, in many respects, a failed experiment," said Jonathan Mayer, an assistant computer science professor at Princeton University. "There's a question of whether it's time to declare failure, move on, and withdraw the feature from web browsers." That's a big deal coming from Mayer: He spent four years of his life helping to bring Do Not Track into existence in the first place. Only a handful of sites actually respect the request -- the most prominent of which are Pinterest and Medium (Pinterest won't use offsite data to target ads to a visitor who's elected not to be tracked, while Medium won't send their data to third parties.)

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YouTube is Down

Slashdot - Wed, 2018-10-17 02:00
YouTube is facing outage worldwide, users and web tracker DownDetector reported Tuesday evening. Users attempting to visit the site have reported seeing a blank website frame instead of the usual homepage. The YouTube app also showed the same problems. In a tweet, YouTube said it was working on resolving the issues on YouTube, YouTube TV, and YouTube Music.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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The mysterious life of Luc Esape, bug fixer extraordinaire. His big secret? He's not human

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 01:13
Hiding under an assumed name to avoid discrimination, Repairnator is unmasked

Analysis Luc Esape leads a double life. The software engineer on the Spirals research team at the University of Lille in France goes by another name, Repairnator.…

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The secret life of Luc Escape, bug fixer

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 01:13
Hiding under an assumed name to avoid discrimination, Repairnator is unmasked

Luc Escape leads a double life. The software engineer on the Spirals research team at the University of Lille in France goes by another name, Repairnator.…

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Chrome 70 Arrives With Option To Disable Linked Sign-Ins, PWAs On Windows, and AV1 Decoder

Slashdot - Wed, 2018-10-17 00:30
Krystalo quotes a report from VentureBeat: Google today launched Chrome 70 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The release includes an option to disable linking Google site and Chrome sign-ins, Progressive Web Apps on Windows, the ability for users to restrict extensions' access to a custom list of sites, an AV1 decoder, and plenty more. You can update to the latest version now using Chrome's built-in updater or download it directly from google.com/chrome. An anonymous Slashdot reader adds: "The most anticipated addition to today's release is a new Chrome setting panel option that allows users to control how the browser behaves when they log into a Google account," reports ZDNet. "Google added this new setting after the company was accused last month of secretly logging users into their Chrome browser accounts whenever they logged into a Google website." Chrome 70 also comes with support for the AV1 video format, TLS 1.3 final, per-site Chrome extension permissions, TouchID and fingerprint sensor authentication, the Shape Detection API (gives Chrome the ability to detect and identify faces, barcodes, and text inside images or webcam feeds), and, last but not least, 23 security fixes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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IBM talks 'emerging, high value segments' – so you know the Q3 numbers aren't great

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 00:11
Big Blue's $18.8bn revenue falls short of expectations

IBM saw its stock price take a hit Tuesday afternoon after the enterprise tech giant saw quarterly revenues miss the mark.…

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IBM talks 'emerging, high value segments', so you know the Q3 numbers aren't great

TheRegister - Wed, 2018-10-17 00:11
Big Blue's $18.8bn revenue falls short of expectations

IBM saw its stock price take a hit Tuesday afternoon after the enterprise tech giant saw quarterly revenues miss the mark.…

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Tech hub blames tech: San Francisco fingers Uber, Lyft rides for its growing traffic headache

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-10-16 23:56
Nothing to do with lousy infrastructure, poor public transport, etc etc etc

As any San Francisco Bay Area resident knows traffic is bad and getting worse, but the city's officials think they have found the culprit: ride-hailing companies.…

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San Francisco blames Uber and Lyft for its growing traffic problems

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-10-16 23:56
Nothing to do with lousy infrastructure, poor public transport etc

As any Bay Area resident knows traffic is bad and getting worse, but San Francisco thinks it has found the culprit - ride-hailing companies.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Palm Is Back With a Mini Companion Android Phone That's Exclusive To Verizon

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 23:50
A couple months ago, it was reported that the dearly departed mobile brand known as Palm would be making a comeback. That day has finally come. Yesterday, Palm announced The Palm, a credit card-sized Android smartphone that's supposed to act as a second phone. Droid Life reports: The Palm, which is its name, is a mini-phone with a 3.3-inch HD display that's about the size of a credit card, so it should fit nicely in your palm. It could be put on a chain or tossed in a small pocket or tucked just about anywhere, thanks to that small size. It's still a mostly fully-featured smartphone, though, with cameras and access to Android apps and your Verizon phone number and texts. The idea here is that you have a normal phone with powerful processor and big screen that you use most of the time. But when you want to disconnect some, while not being fully disconnected, you could grab Palm instead of your other phone. It uses Verizon's NumberSync to bring your existing phone number with you, just like you would if you had an LTE smartwatch or other LTE equipped device. Some of the specs of this Verizon-exclusive phone include a Snapdragon 435 processor with 3GB RAM, 32GB storage, 12MP rear and 8MP front cameras, 800mAh battery, IP68 water and dust resistance, and Android 8.1. As Kellen notes, "It does cost $350, which is a lot for a faux phone..." We've already seen a number of gadget fans perplexed by this device. Digital Trends goes as far as calling it "the stupidest product of the year."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Thought Patch Tuesday was a load? You'll want to avoid this Oracle mega-advisory then

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-10-16 23:13
But you'll definitely want to check out the libssh bug

Oracle has released a wide-ranging security update to address more than 300 CVE-listed vulnerabilities in its various enterprise products.…

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Google Maps Adds EV Charging Station Info

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 23:10
Google Maps is adding a new feature that will let you search for charging stations and provide you with useful information about that station. The feature is rolling out today and will be available on both Android and iOS. Engadget reports: Just search for "EV charging stations" or "EV charging," and Google Maps will locate those nearby. It will also tell you what types of ports are available, how many there are as well as the station's charging speeds, and businesses with charging stations will now have a link that will lead you to more information about their setup. Additionally, you'll be able to see what other users thought of the station, as Google Maps will bring up user-posted photos, ratings and reviews. Google Maps will include information about charging stations from Tesla and Chargepoint worldwide. In the US, it will also source info about SemaConnect, EVgo and Blink stations. UK users will have access to Chargemaster and Pod Point stations, while Australia and New Zealand EV drivers will see info on Chargefox stations. Unfortunately, you won't be able to tell if individual charging stations are occupied. Also, Google doesn't have Electrify America, a Volkswagen subsidiary that's building a nationwide network of fast-charging stations with universal technology.

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Amazon Worker Pushes Bezos To Stop Selling Facial Recognition Tech To Police

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 22:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hill: An Amazon employee is seeking to put new pressure on the company to stop selling its facial recognition technology to law enforcement. An anonymous worker, whose employment at Amazon was verified by Medium, published an op-ed on that platform on Tuesday criticizing the company's facial recognition work and urging the company to respond to an open letter delivered by a group of employees. The employee wrote that the government has used surveillance tools in a way that disproportionately hurts "communities of color, immigrants, and people exercising their First Amendment rights." "Ignoring these urgent concerns while deploying powerful technologies to government and law enforcement agencies is dangerous and irresponsible," the person wrote. "That's why we were disappointed when Teresa Carlson, vice president of the worldwide public sector of Amazon Web Services, recently said that Amazon 'unwaveringly supports' law enforcement, defense, and intelligence customers, even if we don't 'know everything they're actually utilizing the tool for.'" The op-ed comes one day after Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos defended technology companies working with the federal government on matters of defense during Wired's ongoing summit in San Francisco. "If big tech companies are going to turn their back on the U.S. Department of Defense, this country is going to be in trouble," Bezos said on Monday.

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GitHub wants a piece of the Actions with new code jamboree

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-10-16 22:04
Social code biz makes bid to turn workflows into code

At San Francisco's Palace of Fine Arts on Tuesday, GitHub held its annual tech touting talk in a space that once housed the city's Exploratorium science show.…

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Qualcomm's New Wi-Fi Chips Are Meant To Rival 5G Speeds

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 21:50
"Qualcomm is launching a family of chips that can add incredibly high-speed Wi-Fi -- at speeds up to 10 gigabits per second -- to phones, laptops, routers, and so on," reports The Verge. The Wi-Fi standard used for something like replacing a virtual reality headset's data cable with a high-speed wireless link is being updated. Qualcomm's latest chips improve a wireless technology called WiGig, which relies on a connection standard known as 802.11ad, which can hit speeds up to 5 gigabits per second over close to 10 meters. The new generation of that wireless standard, called 802.11ay, can reach speeds twice as fast, and can do so up to 100 meters away, according to Dino Bekis, the head of Qualcomm's mobile and compute connectivity group. The Wi-Fi Alliance says the new standard "increases the peak data rates of WiGig and improves spectrum efficiency and reduces latency." From the report: So why not just use this as normal Wi-Fi, given how fast it gets? Because that range is only line-of-sight -- when there's literally nothing in the way between the transmitter and the receiver. This high-speed Wi-Fi is based on millimeter wave radio waves in the 60GHz range. That means it's really fast, but also that it has a very difficult time penetrating obstacles, like a wall. That's a problem if you want a general purpose wireless technology. That's why 802.11ay, like 802.11ad before it, is being used as an optional add-on to existing Wi-Fi technology. If you're one of the people who has a need for these extreme wireless speeds, then maybe you'll find a use for it. Just keep in mind, you'll probably need to keep your router and the device receiving these high speeds in the same room in order for it to work, due to the whole "walls" issue. WiGig will also be competing with 5G, as it offers "similarly fast speeds over similarly limited distances," reports The Verge. "[T]he two standards may be competing as an option for delivering internet from a tower to a home -- that's what Facebook's Terragraph is doing with WiGig, and it's what Verizon is doing with 5G."

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MongoDB Switches Up Its Open-Source License

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 21:10
MongoDB is taking action against cloud giants who are taking its open-source code and offering a hosted commercial version of its database to their users without playing by the open-source rules. The company announced today that it has issued a new software license, the Server Side Public License (SSPL), "that will apply to all new releases of its MongoDB Community Server, as well as all patch fixes for prior versions," reports TechCrunch. From the report: For virtually all regular users who are currently using the community server, nothing changes because the changes to the license don't apply to them. Instead, this is about what MongoDB sees as the misuse of the AGPLv3 license. "MongoDB was previously licensed under the GNU AGPLv3, which meant companies who wanted to run MongoDB as a publicly available service had to open source their software or obtain a commercial license from MongoDB," the company explains. "However, MongoDB's popularity has led some organizations to test the boundaries of the GNU AGPLv3." So while the SSPL isn't all that different from the GNU GPLv3, with all the usual freedoms to use, modify and redistribute the code (and virtually the same language), the SSPL explicitly states that anybody who wants to offer MongoDB as a service -- or really any other software that uses this license -- needs to either get a commercial license or open source the service to give back the community. "The market is increasingly consuming software as a service, creating an incredible opportunity to foster a new wave of great open source server-side software. Unfortunately, once an open source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for cloud vendors who have not developed the software to capture all of the value but contribute nothing back to the community," said Eliot Horowitz, the CTO and co-founder of MongoDB, in a statement. "We have greatly contributed to -- and benefited from -- open source and we are in a unique position to lead on an issue impacting many organizations. We hope this will help inspire more projects and protect open source innovation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Huawei's Watch GT snubs Google for homegrown OS

TheRegister - Tue, 2018-10-16 21:07
Behold, a new Chinese platform?

Google's decision to shove Java everywhere it can may be as catastrophic as Microsoft's "Windows everywhere" from the 1990s.…

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Facebook Could Use Data Collected From Its Portal In-Home Video Device To Target You With Ads

Slashdot - Tue, 2018-10-16 20:32
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Facebook announced Portal last week, its take on the in-home, voice-activated speaker to rival competitors from Amazon, Google and Apple. Last Monday, we wrote: "No data collected through Portal -- even call log data or app usage data, like the fact that you listened to Spotify -- will be used to target users with ads on Facebook." We wrote that because that's what we were told by Facebook executives. But Facebook has since reached out to change its answer: Portal doesn't have ads, but data about who you call and data about which apps you use on Portal can be used to target you with ads on other Facebook-owned properties. "Portal voice calling is built on the Messenger infrastructure, so when you make a video call on Portal, we collect the same types of information (i.e. usage data such as length of calls, frequency of calls) that we collect on other Messenger-enabled devices. We may use this information to inform the ads we show you across our platforms. Other general usage data, such as aggregate usage of apps, etc., may also feed into the information that we use to serve ads," a spokesperson said in an email to Recode. That isn't very surprising, considering Facebook's business model. The biggest benefit of Facebook owning a device in your home is that it provides the company with another data stream for its ad-targeting business.

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