Linux fréttir

FCC Says Wireless Carriers Lie About Coverage 40% of the Time

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 14:01
A new FCC study confirms what most people already knew: when it comes to wireless coverage maps, your mobile carrier is often lying to you. From a report: If you head to any major wireless carrier website, you'll be inundated with claims of coast to coast, uniform availability of wireless broadband. But, as countless studies have shown, these claims usually have only a tenuous relation to reality, something you've likely noticed if you've ever driving across the country or stopped by mobile carrier forums. But just how bad is the disconnect? A new FCC study released this week suggests that wireless carriers may be lying about mobile coverage 40 percent of the time or more. The full study, part of the FCC's efforts to beef up wireless subsidies ahead of fifth-generation (5G) deployments, states that FCC engineers measured real-world network performance across 12 states. Staffers conducted a total of 24,649 tests while driving more than 10,000 miles. "Only 62.3% of staff drive tests achieved at least the minimum download speed predicted by the coverage maps -- with U.S. Cellular achieving that speed in only 45.0% of such tests, T-Mobile in 63.2% of tests, and Verizon in 64.3% of tests," the FCC said. And while carriers have historically claimed they offer faster 4G LTE service to the vast majority of the country, the FCC found that wasn't actually true either. "Staff was unable to obtain any 4G LTE signal for 38% of drive tests on U.S. Cellular's network, 21.3% of drive tests on T-Mobile's network, and 16.2% of drive tests on Verizon's network, despite each provider reporting coverage in the relevant area," the agency said. But of course, the FCC also has no plans to punish the carriers.

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US Shows a 'Concerning Lack of Regard For the Privacy of People's Biometrics'

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 13:00
Mark Wilson shares a report from BetaNews: When it comes to the extensive and invasive use of biometric data, the USA is one of the worst offenders in the world, faring only slightly better than China. According to research conducted by Comparitech, which rated 50 countries according to how, where and why biometrics were taken and how they are stored, the U.S. ranked as the fourth worst country. Topping the list is China, followed by Malaysia and Pakistan. While Comparitech did not look at every country in the world, its study did compare 50 of them. To give a country a rating out of 25, each was rated out of five in four categories (storage, CCTV, workplace, and visas) according to how invasive and pervasive and the collection and use of biometrics is. Five questions were also applied to them, with each answer in the affirmative resulting in one point. [The five questions are available in the report.] The U.S. was assigned a score of 20/25 for its heavy use of biometrics, including growing use of facial recognition, without there being specific laws to protect citizens' data. There was concern at the growing use of biometrics in the workplace. At the other end of the league are Ireland and Portugal, both praised for their small or non-existent biometric databases. Both scored 11 points.

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Windows 10 Insiders: Begone, foul Store version of Notepad!

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 12:59
You say 20H1, they say 2004, let's call the whole thing off

Microsoft has emitted a fresh build of next year's Windows 10 to both the Slow and Fast rings of the Windows Insider programme and goodness, those guinea pigs weren't keen on Notepad-In-The-Store.…

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Icahn and I will force a Xerox and HP wedding: Corporate raider urges HP shareholders to tell board to act 'NOW'

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 12:42
Billionaire accuses execs of running scared for jobs amid $33.5bn bid

Corporate raider Carl Icahn isn't quietly accepting HP's rejection of Xerox's hostile $33.5bn takeover bid - he has accused the board of using delay tactics to keep their jobs and warning it can be done in a nice or not-so-nice way.…

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Oil be damned: Iran-based crooks flinging malware at Middle Eastern energy plants again – research

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 12:07
ZeroCleare wipes up where Shamoon left off

An Iran-based hacking crew long known to target energy facilities in neighboring Middle Eastern countries is believed to be launching new attacks.…

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Motorola's mid-range One Hyper packs 64MP cam, huge screen and – ooo – 'Quad Pixel' tech

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 11:36
What's that when it's at home? Oh, they mean pixel binning

Motorola has updated its mid-range lineup with the announcement of the Android 10-powered One Hyper.…

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Microsoft emits long-term support .NET Core 3.1, Visual Studio 16.4

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 11:06
Ready to go, but beware 'unfortunate breaking change' in Windows Forms

Microsoft has released .NET Core 3.1 – a significant milestone as, unlike version 3.0, it is a long-term support (LTS) release, suggesting that the company believes it's fit for extended use. It is accompanied by Visual Studio 16.4, also an LTS release.…

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Take Sajid Javid's comments on IR35 UK contractor rules with a bucket of salt, warns tax guru

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 10:02
What now? A pre-election porky? Heaven forfend…

Conservative Party claims they may review the extension of IR35 tax rules to the UK private sector have been called into question by a tax expert.…

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Even 50-Year-Old Climate Models Correctly Predicted Global Warming

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 10:00
sciencehabit writes: Climate change doubters have a favorite target: climate models. They claim that computer simulations conducted decades ago didn't accurately predict current warming, so the public should be wary of the predictive power of newer models. Now, the most sweeping evaluation of these older models -- some half a century old -- shows most of them were indeed accurate. "How much warming we are having today is pretty much right on where models have predicted," says the study's lead author, Zeke Hausfather, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. The researchers compared annual average surface temperatures across the globe to the surface temperatures predicted in 17 forecasts. Those predictions were drawn from 14 separate computer models released between 1970 and 2001. In some cases, the studies and their computer codes were so old that the team had to extract data published in papers, using special software to gauge the exact numbers represented by points on a printed graph. Most of the models accurately predicted recent global surface temperatures, which have risen approximately 0.9C since 1970. For 10 forecasts, there was no statistically significant difference between their output and historic observations, the team reports today in Geophysical Research Letters. Seven older models missed the mark by as much as 0.1C per decade. But the accuracy of five of those forecasts improved enough to match observations when the scientists adjusted a key input to the models: how much climate-changing pollution humans have emitted over the years.

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Just in case you were expecting 10Gbps, Wi-Fi 6 hits 700Mbps in real-world download tests

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 09:00
Pretty fly for a Wi-Fi...

The long-awaited future of super-fast wireless is here, with the Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA) claiming speeds of 700Mbps in a real-world environment using the Wi-Fi 6 standard.…

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We know this sounds weird but in future we could ask fiber optic cables: Did the earth move for you... literally?

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 08:01
Distributed acoustic sensing turns old glass cabling into seismic sensors

Old, unused fiber optic cables buried underground can be refashioned into seismometers, helping scientists monitor earthquakes, according to new research.…

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Tune in and watch online today: How to build a content management platform fit for the future

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 07:00
Advice based on feedback from Register readers and insights from Box

Webcast Financial institutions across the board are wrestling with how to engage more closely with customers and work better across internal teams. Too often, the cause is ill-fitting content and document management systems, designed for another time. Meanwhile, cloud-based platforms can both help and hinder, delivering short-term benefit but adding complexity and fragmentation.…

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Qualcomm's Snapdragon 765 Chip Could Usher In the First Affordable 5G Phones

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 07:00
In addition to the flagship Snapdragon 865 processor, Qualcomm announced details about its other new chip, the midrange Snapdragon 765. "The 765 might actually be the more interesting of the two, thanks to its integrated 5G modem and its likely future of powering cheaper, midrange devices," reports The Verge. From the report: Right now, there's not a lot of 5G devices out there, and the ones that are around tend to be very expensive. The upcoming 865 might help with that. By default, it'll only work with the X55 5G modem, meaning every Android flagship with a Snapdragon 865 (i.e., nearly all of them) will, in theory, be a 5G phone next year. But even cheaper Android phones with Qualcomm's top processor tend to cost upwards of $750. 700-series chips, on the other hand, are found in far cheaper phones, like HMD's Nokia phones, which hit much lower prices. It's a much lower barrier to entry for 5G than anything currently available, and it could be a big part of making the next-generation network accessible to more customers, not just those who are willing to shell out for the top phones. In fact, it's possible that the Snapdragon 765 will enable better 5G experiences than phones with the 865. That's because, unlike the Snapdragon 865, the 765 has a less powerful X52 modem. It's capable of lower speeds (maxing out at 3.7 Gbps, instead of the 7 Gbps the X55 is theoretically capable of). But it has a big advantage: that 5G modem is integrated directly in the 765 chipset, meaning it should offer improved power efficiency (and, therefore, battery life) than the X55, which is its own separate chip. It'll also support a wider range of 5G standards than the current X50 modem, with Qualcomm promising support for mmWave and sub-6GHz, standalone and non-standalone 5G, and TDD and FDD with Dynamic Spectrum Sharing (DSS) network types. Both the Snapdragon 765 and 765G, which features a new Qualcomm Adreno 620 GPU, are expected to come to market in the first quarter of 2020.

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123-Reg is at it again: Registrar charges chap for domains he didn’t order – and didn't want

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 05:55
The great .uk foist is still rumbling along

Two months after promising customers that its past practices of automatically registering, and charging, customers for .uk domains was all a big misunderstanding, pushy registrar 123-Reg is at it again, charging at least one punter for .uk domains they never ordered and don’t want.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

New Iranian Wiper Discovered In Attacks On Middle Eastern Companies

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: IBM X-Force, the company's security unit, has published a report of a new form of "wiper" malware connected to threat groups in Iran and used in a destructive attack against companies in the Middle East. The sample was discovered in a response to an attack on what an IBM spokesperson described as "a new environment in the [Middle East] -- not in Saudi Arabia, but another regional rival of Iran." Dubbed ZeroCleare, the malware is "a likely collaboration between Iranian state-sponsored groups," according to a report by IBM X-Force researchers. The attacks were targeted against specific organizations and used brute-force password attacks to gain access to network resources. The initial phase of the attacks was launched from Amsterdam IP addresses owned by a group tied to what IBM refers to as the "ITG13 Group" -- also known as "Oilrig" and APT34. Another Iranian threat group may have used the same addresses to access accounts prior to the wiper campaign. In addition to brute force attacks on network accounts, the attackers exploited a SharePoint vulnerability to drop web shells on a SharePoint server. These included China Chopper, Tunna, and another Active Server Pages-based webshell named "extensions.aspx," which "shared similarities with the ITG13 tool known as TWOFACE/SEASHARPEE," the IBM researchers reported. They also attempted to install TeamViewer remote access software and used a modified version of the Mimikatz credential-stealing tool -- obfuscated to hide its intent -- to steal more network credentials off the compromised servers. From there, they moved out across the network to spread the ZeroCleare malware. "While X-Force IRIS cannot attribute the activity observed during the destructive phase of the ZeroCleare campaign," the researchers noted, "we assess that high-level similarities with other Iranian threat actors, including the reliance on ASPX web shells and compromised VPN accounts, the link to ITG13 activity, and the attack aligning with Iranian objectives in the region, make it likely this attack was executed by one or more Iranian threat groups."

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Rivers Could Generate 2,000 Nuclear Power Plants Worth of Energy With 'Blue' Membrane

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 02:10
sciencehabit shares a report from Science Magazine: Green energy advocates may soon be turning blue. A new membrane could unlock the potential of 'blue energy,' which uses chemical differences between fresh- and saltwater to generate electricity. If researchers can scale up the postage stamp -- size membrane in an affordable fashion, it could provide carbon-free power to millions of people in coastal nations where freshwater rivers meet the sea. Blue energy's promise stems from its scale: Rivers dump some 37,000 cubic kilometers of freshwater into the oceans every year. This intersection between fresh- and saltwater creates the potential to generate lots of electricity -- 2.6 terawatts, according to one recent estimate, roughly the amount that can be generated by 2,000 nuclear power plants. By pumping positive ions to the other side of a semipermeable membrane, researchers can create two pools of water: one with a positive charge, and one with a negative charge. If they then dunk electrodes in the pools and connect them with a wire, electrons will flow from the negatively charged to the positively charged side, generating electricity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Kubernetes? 'I don't believe in one tool to rule the world,' says AWS' Sassy Jassy

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 01:36
Collaborating with other companies is such a drag

re:Invent AWS CEO Andy Jassy, asked about the future role of Kubernetes (K8s) in cloud infrastructure, told The Register that "I don’t believe in one tool to rule the world."…

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TikTok's Parent Company Sued For Collecting Data On Kids

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 01:30
TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, is being sued after allegedly violating child privacy laws and collecting the data of young users through the video app, which was formerly called Musical.ly. The Verge reports: ByteDance acquired Musical.ly in 2017, which it later rebranded as the enormously popular social video app TikTok. According to the December 3rd complaint, ByteDance has collected data from Musical.ly users under the age of 13 without their parents' explicit consent "since at least 2014" and sold the data to third-party advertisers. The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, forbids social media companies from collecting the data of children without explicit parental consent. Failing to obtain that consent would be in violation of the law and open the company up to potential lawsuits from regulators like the Federal Trade Commission. "TikTok was made aware of the allegations in the complaint some time ago, and although we disagree with much of what is alleged in the complaint, we have been working with the parties involved to reach a resolution of the issues," a TikTok spokesperson told The Verge. "That resolution should be announced soon." TikTok is also facing a class-action lawsuit in the U.S. that claims it transferred "vast quantities" of user data to China. The lawsuit was filed in a Californian court last week.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Ford Will Turn McDonald's Used Coffee Bean Husks Into Car Parts

Slashdot - Thu, 2019-12-05 01:10
Ford will soon start using coffee chaff from McDonald's to manufacture auto parts like headlamp housings and other interior and exterior components. "In addition to making Ford vehicles a little bit 'greener,' the coffee chaff -- or the waste produced by coffee during the roasting process -- will apparently also help the company make parts that are 20 percent lighter," reports Engadget. From the report: Ford already uses various sustainable materials like soy and tree cellulose in an effort to only use recycled and renewable plastics in its vehicles. It has added coffee chaff to the list after its research team discovered that it can be turned into a durable product by heating it to high temperatures under low oxygen and mixing it with additives like plastic. The material will then be turned into pellets that can be formed into various shapes. During the team's tests, they found that the chaff-based material has "significantly better" heat properties than the current material Ford is using. They also discovered that it'll allow the company to enjoy 25 percent energy savings during the molding process. McDonald's is expected to earmark a significant portion of the coffee chaff its North American operations produce for this project. While it's not entirely clear how much chaff that is, McD's generates 62 million pounds of chaff a year in the continent alone, which is currently just used to make coal and garden mulch.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Atlassian scrambles to fix zero-day security hole accidentally disclosed on Twitter

TheRegister - Thu, 2019-12-05 00:55
Exposed private cert key may also be an issue for IBM Aspera

Twitter security celeb SwiftOnSecurity on Tuesday inadvertently disclosed a zero-day vulnerability affecting enterprise software biz Atlassian, a flaw that may be echoed in IBM's Aspera software.…

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