Linux fréttir

Yale Security Fail: 'Unexpected load' caused systems to crash, whacked our Smart Living Home app

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 16:30
All working now says biz. No, no, no, no, say customers, it is NOT!

An unspecified and “unexpected load” on its infrastructure broke the Smart Living Home app for a day, an apologetic Yale Security UK confirmed to customers yesterday - however the smell of failure still lingers today.…

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Yale Security Fail: 'Unexpected load' caused systems to crash, whacked our Smart Living Home app

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 16:30
All working now says biz. No, no, no, no, say customers, it is NOT!

An unspecified and “unexpected load” on its infrastructure broke the Smart Living Home app for a day, an apologetic Yale Security UK confirmed to customers yesterday - however the smell of failure still lingers today.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Quantum Computers Will Break the Encryption that Protects the Internet

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 16:11
An anonymous reader shares a report: Factorising numbers into their constituent primes may sound esoteric, but the one-way nature of the problem -- and of some other, closely related mathematical tasks -- is the foundation on which much modern encryption rests. Such encryption has plenty of uses. It defends state secrets, and the corporate sort. It protects financial flows and medical records. And it makes the $2trn e-commerce industry possible. Nobody, however, is certain that the foundation of all this is sound. Though mathematicians have found no quick way to solve the prime-factors problem, neither have they proved that there isn't one. In theory, any of the world's millions of professional or amateur mathematicians could have a stroke of inspiration tomorrow and publish a formula that unravels internet cryptography -- and most internet commerce with it. In fact, something like this has already happened. In 1994 Peter Shor, a mathematician then working at Bell Laboratories, in America, came up with a quick and efficient way to find a number's prime factors. The only catch was that for large numbers his method -- dubbed Shor's algorithm -- needs a quantum computer to work. Quantum computers rely on the famous weirdness of quantum mechanics to perform certain sorts of calculation far faster than any conceivable classical machine. Their fundamental unit is the "qubit", a quantum analogue of the ones and zeros that classical machines manipulate. By exploiting the quantum-mechanical phenomena of superposition and entanglement, quantum computers can perform some forms of mathematics -- though only some -- far faster than any conceivable classical machine, no matter how beefy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Google Warns Apple: Missing Bugs in Your Security Bulletins Are 'Disincentive To Patch'

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 15:31
Apple has not documented some high-severity bugs it patched that were reported to it by Google's Project Zero researchers. From a report: While it's good news that Apple beat Project Zero's 90-day deadline for patching or disclosing the bugs it finds, the group's Ivan Fratric recently argued that the practice endangered users by not fully informing them why an update should be installed. This time the criticism comes from Project Zero's Ian Beer, who's been credited by Apple with finding dozens of serious security flaws in iOS and macOS over the years. Beer posted a blog about several vulnerabilities in iOS 7 he found in 2014 that share commonalities with several bugs he has found in iOS 11.4.1, some of which he's now released exploits for. Beer notes that none of the latest issues is mentioned in the iOS 12 security bulletin even though Apple did fix them. The absence of information about them is a "disincentive" for iOS users to patch, Beer argues. "Apple are still yet to assign CVEs for these issues or publicly acknowledge that they were fixed in iOS 12," wrote Beer. "In my opinion a security bulletin should mention the security bugs that were fixed. Not doing so provides a disincentive for people to update their devices since it appears that there were fewer security fixes than there really were."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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There's no 'I' in 'IMFT' – because Micron intends to buy Intel out of 3D XPoint joint venture

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 15:30
Chipzilla has to go it alone or turn to a partner

Micron has announced its intent to buy out Intel's interest in Intel Micron Flash Technologies (IMFT), the pair's flash and 3D XPoint foundry joint venture.…

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Should We Break Up the Tech Giants? Not if You Ask the Economists Who Take Money From Them

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 14:50
This week's FTC hearings on the growing power of companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Google only included economists who have taken money, directly and indirectly, from giant corporations that have a stake in the debate. From a report: Amid growing concern over the power of such behemoths as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and other tech giants, in recent months there's been a bipartisan push for better enforcement of antitrust rules -- with even President Trump saying in August that their size and influence could constitute a "very antitrust situation." The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has launched its most wide-ranging study of corporate concentration in America in more than 20 years with a series of hearings being held around the country. Chairman Joseph Simons, a practical enforcement-minded leader, launched the hearings by expressing concern over the growing problem of monopoly, which is now found in nearly every sector of the economy. "I approach all of these issues with a very open mind," said Simons, "very much willing to be influenced by what I see and hear." But there's a problem. The FTC organized these hearings so that Simons and the public would be hearing from many economists who have taken money, directly or indirectly, from giant corporations. For example, on Monday, the FTC convened a panel titled "The Current Economic Understanding of Multi-Sided Platforms" to look specifically at the most dynamic and dangerous set of concentrated economic actors, the big tech platforms. Every single one of the economists who testified had financial ties to giant corporations. One example is David Evans, the chairman of the Global Economics Group. Evans scoffed at the danger of platform monopolies. He indicated that the question of "whether Facebook and Google and Amazon are monopolies, it's all interesting, it's great to read in the New York Times," but it's "not all that relevant" to the practice of antitrust. His firm has taken money directly from Microsoft, Visa, the large investment bank SIFMA, and the Chinese giant tech giant Tencent. Another example is Howard Shelanski, a partner at Davis Polk. Shelanski is more enforcement-minded, but he expressed caution, testifying that we don't know enough for antitrust enforcers to understand whether powerful technology companies hold unassailable market positions. Shelanski pointed to his own children, saying that they've stopped using Facebook because it's uncool. As it turns out, his law firm's clients include Facebook, as well as Comcast, and Chinese search giant Baidu.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Facebook names former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg head of global affairs

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 14:31
Zuck and Clegg in Silicon Valley – no, it's not the latest Netflix satire

Facebook has hired former British deputy PM Nick Clegg to head up its global affairs – a move that reportedly involved boss Mark Zuckerberg spending months “wooing” the Lib Dem has-been.…

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Google App Suite Costs as Much as $40 Per Phone Under New EU Android Deal

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 14:10
Android manufacturers will have to pay Google a surprisingly high cost in Europe in order to include Google's Play Store and other mobile apps on their devices, according to documents obtained by The Verge. From the report: A confidential fee schedule shows costs as high as $40 per device to install the "Google Mobile Services" suite of apps, which includes the Google Play Store. The new fees vary depending on country and device type, and it would apply to devices activated on or after February 1st, 2019. But phone manufacturers may not actually have to shoulder that cost: Google is also offering separate agreements to cover some or all of the licensing costs for companies that choose to install Chrome and Google search on their devices as well, according to a person familiar with the terms. Google declined to comment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Metadata-farming, data-silo-killing startup: Go on. Bring us your unstructured stuff

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 13:36
Former Primary Data boss talks to El Reg about Hammerspace

+Comment Newcomer on the storage software-as-a-service scene Hammerspace announced the general availability of its eponymous SaaS application this week. This software has been engineered using technology from Primary Data – yes, that Primary Data – applied to hybrid IT and cloud environments, providing a SaaS cloud-control plane.…

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Sounds like a massive, risky UK.gov scheme, but let's not keep too many tabs on it, OK?

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 13:33
Spending watchdog slams transparency and record-keeping on major projects

The UK's spending watchdog has said it isn't possible to tell whether the biggest and most risky government projects are doing what they're supposed to because of poor records and incomplete reporting.…

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Is Repair As Important As Innovation?

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 13:00
An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from The Economist: Events about making new things are ten a penny. Less common are events about keeping things as good as new. Maintenance lacks the glamour of innovation. It is mostly noticed in its absence -- the tear in a shirt, the mould on a ceiling, the spluttering of an engine. Not long ago David Edgerton of Imperial College London, who also spoke at the festival, drove across the bridge in Genoa that collapsed in August, killing 43 people (pictured). 'We're encouraged to pride ourselves on all being innovators and entrepreneurs,' he said. Maintenance is often dismissed as mere drudgery. But in fact, as he pointed out, repairing things is often trickier than making them. It is also more difficult for economists to measure. The discipline's most prominent statistic, GDP, is gross (as opposed to net) because it leaves out the cost of wear and tear. To calculate these costs, statisticians must estimate the lifespan of a country's assets and make assumptions about the way they deteriorate. [...] And how much do economies spend fighting decay? No one knows, partly because most maintenance is performed in-house, not purchased on the market. The best numbers are collected by Canada, where firms spent 3.3% of GDP on repairs in 2016, more than twice as much as the country spends on research and development. In closing, the report mentions the tyrannies of the ancient East where people were forced to maintain fragile irrigation systems. "In those societies, to repair was to repress," the report says. "But some people today have the opposite concern. They see maintenance and repair as a right they are in danger of losing to companies that hoard spare parts and information too jealously."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Insects with farts that smell like coriander assist in covering up Paris's aroma d'urine

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 12:20
Sightings of Asian stink bug in French capital spike

Oh, c'est mal, les punaises diaboliques sont arrivés à Paris! But before you pack the holy water if sojourning in the French capital this winter, you should know a clothes peg might be more suitable.…

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Peter Thiel's Palantir reportedly eyeing up $41bn IPO

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 11:45
Spies' fave data mining biz could go public as early as late 2019 – reports

CIA-backed data-mining business Palantir is reportedly in talks with banks to take the company public for a blockbuster sum, and could move as early as next year.…

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European Commission: We've called off the lawyers over Ireland's late collection of Apple back taxes

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 11:15
Case closed month after Apple coughs $14.3bn in 'illegal State Aid'

The European Commission has decided to withdraw court action against Ireland over the delayed recovery of €14.3bn worth of back taxes that were ruled as illegal state aid, it has confirmed.…

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It's Two Spacecraft, One Mission as BepiColombo gets ready to launch

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 10:45
JAXA and ESA in a tree, going to visit Mercury

BepiColombo, the first mission to Mercury for the European Space Agency (ESA), is due to lift off tomorrow morning at 0145 UTC on an Ariane 5 rocket.…

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Have you made DevOps, Containers or CD work for you? Tell us about it

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 10:10
Continuous Lifecycle London ‘19: Call for papers closes tonight

Events If you want to tell hundreds of your peers how you've used DevOps, containers, continuous delivery or agile to improve your software operations, be quick - the call for papers for Continuous Lifecycle London closes tonight.…

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IBM Finally Proves That Quantum Systems Are Faster Than Classical Systems

Slashdot - Fri, 2018-10-19 10:00
In a paper published Thursday in the journal Science, Dr. Sergey Bravyi and his team reveal that they've developed a mathematical proof which, in specific cases, illustrates the quantum algorithm's inherent computational advantages over classical. Engadget reports: "It's good to know, because results like this become parts of algorithms," Bob Sutor, vice president of IBM Q Strategy and Ecosystem, told Engadget. "They become part of decisions about how people will start to attack problems. Where will they try classical techniques? Where will they try quantum techniques? How will those interplay? How will they work back and forth together?" What's more, the proof shows that, in these cases, the quantum algorithm can solve the problem in a fixed number of steps, regardless of how many inputs are added. With a classical computer, the more inputs you add, the more steps it needs to take in order to solve. Such are the advantages of parallel processing. "The main point of this paper is not that somehow we discover some incredibly important quantum algorithm, or some practical, interesting problem," Bravyi told Engadget. "We ask if we can separate a constant depth [between] quantum and classical algorithms. As we increase the problem size, the runtime of the quantum algorithm remains constant, but the total number of operations grows." As Bravyi points out, this new proof doesn't, in and of itself, solve any existing computational issues. Instead, "it gives us insight into what makes a quantum computers more powerful," he continued. "And hopefully in the future it will lead to more practical, useful algorithms."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Ex-Huawei man claims Chinese giant is suing his startup to 'surpass' US tech dominance

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 09:50
Both parties accuse each other of IP theft

CNEX Labs co-founder and CTO Yiren Ronnie Huang have accused Huawei and its subsidiary Futurewei of engaging in industrial espionage to steal CNEX's SSD intellectual property.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Silent running: Computer sounds are so '90s

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 09:15
'Do not disturb' mode isn't for you, it's for the rest of us

Something for the Weekend, Sir? Hold down the Shift key as you drag the vertical divider horizontally, and you find that you can adjust the column width in your table without changing the……

Categories: Linux fréttir

Anonymous Amazonian demands withdrawal of face-recog kit from sale

TheRegister - Fri, 2018-10-19 08:43
Was your anti-surveillance letter sinkholed? Write a blog about it

Seemingly annoyed at being ignored, an anonymous person claiming to be an Amazon employee has repeated demands for the online behemoth to stop selling its Rekognition product to American police agencies.…

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