Linux fréttir

How Will AI Transform the Future of Work?

Slashdot - Mon, 2024-07-15 00:20
An anonymous reader shared this report from the Guardian: In March, after analysing 22,000 tasks in the UK economy, covering every type of job, a model created by the Institute for Public Policy Research predicted that 59% of tasks currently done by humans — particularly women and young people — could be affected by AI in the next three to five years. In the worst-case scenario, this would trigger a "jobs apocalypse" where eight million people lose their jobs in the UK alone.... Darrell West, author of The Future of Work: AI, Robots and Automation, says that just as policy innovations were needed in Thomas Paine's time to help people transition from an agrarian to an industrial economy, they are needed today, as we transition to an AI economy. "There's a risk that AI is going to take a lot of jobs," he says. "A basic income could help navigate that situation." AI's impact will be far-reaching, he predicts, affecting blue- and white-collar jobs. "It's not just going to be entry-level people who are affected. And so we need to think about what this means for the economy, what it means for society as a whole. What are people going to do if robots and AI take a lot of the jobs?" Nell Watson, a futurist who focuses on AI ethics, has a more pessimistic view. She believes we are witnessing the dawn of an age of "AI companies": corporate environments where very few — if any — humans are employed at all. Instead, at these companies, lots of different AI sub-personalities will work independently on different tasks, occasionally hiring humans for "bits and pieces of work". These AI companies have the potential to be "enormously more efficient than human businesses", driving almost everyone else out of business, "apart from a small selection of traditional old businesses that somehow stick in there because their traditional methods are appreciated"... As a result, she thinks it could be AI companies, not governments, that end up paying people a basic income. AI companies, meanwhile, will have no salaries to pay. "Because there are no human beings in the loop, the profits and dividends of this company could be given to the needy. This could be a way of generating support income in a way that doesn't need the state welfare. It's fully compatible with capitalism. It's just that the AI is doing it."

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UK cyber-boss slams China's bug-hoarding laws

TheRegister - Mon, 2024-07-15 00:03
Plus: Japanese scientists ID ancient supernova; AWS dismisses China trouble rumor; and more

ASIA IN BRIEF The interim CEO of the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has criticized China's approach to bug reporting.…

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The World's Population Is Projected To Peak At 10.3 Billion In the 2080s

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 22:53
Long-time Slashdot reader Geoffrey.landis writes: According to a new report from the United Nations, the world population is expected to grow to an estimated peak of 10.3 billion people in the mid-2080s, an increase over the current global population of 8.2 billion people. The estimated world population at the end of the century (2100) is now expected to be 6% less than estimates from a decade ago. However, calculating the number of future people is not a perfect science, with "many sources of uncertainty in estimating the global population," according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It estimated the world reached 8 billion people last September, while the U.N. timed the milestone nearly one year earlier.

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To Avoid Sea Level Rise, Some Researchers Propose Barriers Around the World's Vulnerable Glaciers

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 21:53
"Researchers are proposing a new way to battle the effects of climate change..." writes Science magazine: slowing the rising of sea levels with "glacial geoengineering". (That is, "building flexible barriers around them or drilling deep into them to slow their slippage into the sea.") Geoengineering proponents say it would be better to begin research now on how to staunch sea level rise at its source, rather than spending billions and billions of dollars to wall off coastal cities. "At some point you have to think, 'Well, is there anything else we can do?'" asks glaciologist John Moore of the University of Lapland, an author on the white paper, which was sponsored by the University of Chicago. One idea researched by Moore and covered in the report is to build buoyant "curtains," moored to the sea floor beyond the edge of ice shelves and glaciers, to block natural currents of warm water that erode ice sheets from below. (Especially in Antarctica, warming ocean water is a bigger threat to glaciers than warming air.) Early designs called for plastic, but natural fibers such as canvas and sisal are now being considered to avoid pollution concerns. According to the white paper, initial modeling studies show that curtain heights stretching only partway up from the sea floor off the coast of western Antarctica could reduce glacial melting by a factor of 10 in some locations. Another intervention some scientists are contemplating would slow the slippage of ice sheets by drilling holes to their bases and pumping out water or heat. Such massive engineering efforts would surely be some of the most expensive ever undertaken by humanity. At a workshop at the University of Chicago in October 2023, researchers suggested it might cost $88 billion to build 80 kilometers of curtains around Antarctic glaciers. Interventions would also require international political support, which some glaciologists view as an even bigger hurdle than the price tag. Twila Moon, a glaciologist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center, says such projects would require fleets of icebreakers, extensive shipping and supply chain needs, and significant personnel to construct, maintain, and guard the final structures — in ocean conditions she calls "eye-poppingly difficult." The projects could also incur unintended consequences, potentially disrupting ocean circulation patterns or endangering wildlife. Furthermore, it would take decades to find out whether the interventions were working. Even if the engineering and logistics were possible, that "does not answer the question of whether it should be pursued," says Moon, who opposes even preliminary studies on the concepts. "The report, which also stresses the importance of emissions reductions, takes pains to say it 'does not advocate for intervention; rather, it advocates for research into whether any interventions may be viable'..."

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How Microsoft, Dell and Other Large US Employers Accommodate Neurodivergent Employees

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 20:34
As the number of autism diagnoses rises in America, a number of large employers "are taking steps to make workplaces more accessible and welcoming for neurodivergent employees," reports the New York Times — including Microsoft, Dell and Ford. [Alternate URL here.] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 36 8-year-olds in the United States has autism. That's up from 1 in 44 in 2018 and 1 in 150 in 2000, an increase that experts attribute, in part, to better screening. In addition, 2.2% of adults in the country, or 5.4 million people, are autistic, according to the CDC... Autism activists have praised companies that have become more accepting of remote work since the coronavirus pandemic. Workplaces with too much light and noise can overwhelm those who are autistic, leading to burnout, said Jessica Myszak, a clinical psychologist in Chicago who specializes in testing and evaluations for autism. Remote work "reduces the social demands and some of the environmental sensitivities" that autistic people struggle with, Myszak added. The article notes Microsoft's neurodiversity hiring program, which was established in 2015. The company's program was modeled after a venture created by the German software firm SAP, and has since been adopted in some form by companies including Dell and Ford. The initiative has brought in about 300 full-time neurodivergent employees to Microsoft, said Neil Barnett, the company's director for inclusive hiring and accessibility. "All they needed was this different, more inclusive process," Barnett said, "and once they got into the company, they flourished." [One job applicant] was given a job coach to help her with time management and prioritization. Microsoft also paired her with a mentor who showed her around the company's campus in Redmond. Perhaps more important, she works with managers who have received neurodiversity training. The Microsoft campus also has "focus rooms," where lights can be dimmed and the heights of desks can be changed to fit sensory preferences. Employees seated in the open office may also request to sit away from busy aisles or receive noise-canceling headphones.

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AT&T Paid $370,000 For the Deletion of Stolen Phone Call Records

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 19:22
AT&T paid more than $300,000 to a member of the team that stole call records for tens of millions of customers, reports Wired — "to delete the data and provide a video demonstrating proof of deletion." The hacker, who is part of the notorious ShinyHunters hacking group that has stolen data from a number of victims through unsecured Snowflake cloud storage accounts, tells WIRED that AT&T paid the ransom in May. He provided the address for the cryptocurrency wallet that sent the currency to him, as well as the address that received it. WIRED confirmed, through an online blockchain tracking tool, that a payment transaction occurred on May 17 in the amount of 5.7 bitcoin... The hacker initially demanded $1 million from AT&T but ultimately agreed to a third of that. WIRED viewed the video that the hacker says he provided to AT&T as proof to the telecom that he had deleted its stolen data from his computer... AT&T is one of more than 150 companies that are believed to have had data stolen from poorly secured Snowflake accounts during a hacking spree that unfolded throughout April and May. It's been previously reported that the accounts were not secured with multi-factor authentication, so after the hackers obtained usernames and passwords for the accounts, and in some cases authorization tokens, they were able to access the storage accounts of companies and siphon their data. Ticketmaster, the banking firm Santander, LendingTree, and Advance Auto Parts were all among the victims publicly identified to date... The timeline suggests that if [John] Binns is responsible for the AT&T breach, he allegedly did it when he was likely already aware that he was under indictment for the T-Mobile hack and could face arrest for it.

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Thunderbird 128: Annual ESR Brings New Features and 'a Rust Revolution'

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 17:36
Thunderbird's annual Extended Support Release was revealed Friday, promising "significant" improvements to the overall user experience and "the speed at which we can deliver new features to you," according to the Thunderbird blog: We've devoted significant development time integrating Rust — a modern programming language originally created by Mozilla Research — into Thunderbird. Even though this is a seemingly invisible change, it is a major leap forward because it enhances our code quality and performance. This overhaul will allow us to share features between the desktop and future mobile versions of Thunderbird, and speed up our development process. It's a win for our developers and a win for you. More from the blog OMG Ubuntu: I'm also stoked to see that Thunderbird 128 makes 'newest first' the default sort order for messages in message list. While some prefer the old way, I always found it strange that the oldest mails were shown first — team reverse chronology, represent! They also cite "a number of OpenPGP improvements," plus a new preference option for displaying full names and email addresses of all recipients in the message list. (Plus, threaded-message views now display a "New Message" count.) Other new features in this release: A new and more attractive layout for Cards View (with adjustable heights) that "makes it easier to scan your email threads and glean information." The folder pane has better recall of message thread states Improved theme compatibility. "Your Thunderbird should blend seamlessly with your desktop environment, matching the system's accent colors perfectly." (Especially beneficial on Ubuntu and Mint.) You can now customize the color of your account icon. The Thunderbird blog also mentions that "We plan to launch the first phase of built-in support for Exchange, as well as Mozilla Sync, in a future Nebula point release (e.g. Thunderbird 128.X)."

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California Prohibited From Enforcing PI Licensing Law Against Anti-Spam Crusader

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 16:34
Long-time Slashdot reader schwit1 shared this report from non-profit libertarian law firm, the Institute for Justice: U.S. District Judge Rita Lin has permanently enjoined the California Bureau of Security and Investigative Services from enforcing its private-investigator licensing requirement against anti-spam entrepreneur Jay Fink. The order declares that forcing Jay to get a license to run his business is so irrational that it violates the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment... Jay's business stems from California's anti-spam act, which allows individuals to sue spammers. But to sue, they have to first compile evidence. To do that, recipients often have to wade through thousands of emails. For more than a decade, Jay has offered a solution: he and his team will scour a client's junk folder and catalog the messages that likely violate the law. But last summer, Jay's job — and Californians' ability to bring spammers to justice — came to a screeching halt when the state told him he was a criminal. A regulator told Jay he needed a license to read through emails that might be used as evidence in a lawsuit. And because Jay didn't have a private investigator license, the state shut him down. The state of California has since "agreed to jointly petition the court for an order that forever prohibits it from enforcing its licensure law against Jay," according to the article. Otherwise the anti-spam crusader would've had to endure thousands of hours of private investigator training...

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Apple Approves PC/Linux/Mac-Emulating App 'UTM SE' for App Store, Reversing Earlier Rejection

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 15:34
At the end of June, Apple's App Store rejected the Windows/retro PC emulator "UTM SE". But in a reversal Apple approved the app Saturday, reports the Verge. "We are happy to announce that UTM SE is available (for free) on iOS and visionOS App Store," the developer posted on X, "and coming soon to AltStore PAL." From the Verge: After Apple rejected the app in June, the developer said it wasn't going to keep trying because the app was "a subpar experience." Today, UTM thanked the AltStore team for helping it and credited another developer "whose QEMU TCTI implementation was pivotal for this JIT-less build." As with other emulators on the App Store, you can't do much with UTM SE out of the box. It doesn't come with any operating systems, though the app does link to UTM's site, which has guides for Windows XP through Windows 11 emulation, as well as downloads of pre-built virtual Linux machines. Mac OS 9.2.1 and DOS are listed in one screenshot from the UTM SE App Store page. Mac OS 9.2.1 and DOS are listed in one screenshot from the UTM SE App Store page.

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Fastest Object Ever Made By Humans Continues Circling the Sun, 500x Faster Than Sound

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 14:34
An anonymous reader shared this report from ScienceAlert: NASA's Parker Solar Probe, tasked with taking a close-up look at the Sun's outer corona, has just equalled the record for the fastest-moving human-made object ever. The previous record holder? The Parker Solar Probe, again. The probe was recorded traveling at 635,266 kilometers (394,736 miles) per hour on June 29, the second time it's reached that speed since it launched in 2018. We're talking around 500 times faster than the speed of sound here. It's on course to get even faster too, with a top speed of around 692,000 kph (430,000 mph) expected when it makes its closest approach to the Sun in 2025. It's the probe's 20th approach to the sun, according to the article, with the probe using Venus "to create a sort of gravity-powered slingshot," according to the article. (NASA has created a nice interactive 3D model of the probe...) Besides collecting particle samples in 2021, "The probe is eventually going to get nice and close to the swirling mass of ultra-hot plasma surrounding the Sun, and take a wealth of different measurements to help improve our scientific understanding of it."

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Rust Leaps Forward on Language Popularity Index

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 11:34
An anonymous reader shared this report from InfoWorld: Rust has leaped to its highest position ever in the monthly Tiobe index of language popularity, scaling to the 13th spot this month, with placement in the top 10 anticipated in an upcoming edition. Previously, Rust has never gone higher than 17th place in the Tiobe Programming Index. Tiobe CEO Paul Jansen attributed Rust's ascent in the just-released July index to a February 2024 U.S. White House report recommending Rust over C/C+ for safety reasons. He also credited the growing community and ecosystem support for the language. "Rust is finally moving up." The article adds that these rankings are based on "the number of skilled engineers worldwide, courses, and third-party vendors pertaining to languages, examining websites such as Google, Amazon, Wikipedia, and more than 20 others to determine the monthly numbers." Python C++ C Java C# JavaScript Go Visual Basic Fortran SQL Interestingly, Rust has just moved into the top ten on the rival rankings from the rival Pypl Popularity of Programming Language index (which according to the article "assesses how often languages are searched on in Google.") Python Java JavaScript C# C/C++ R PHP TypeScript Swift Rust

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Honey, I shrunk the LLM! A beginner's guide to quantization – and testing it

TheRegister - Sun, 2024-07-14 11:32
Just be careful not to shave off too many bits ... These things are known to hallucinate as it is

Hands on If you hop on Hugging Face and start browsing through large language models, you'll quickly notice a trend: Most have been trained at 16-bit floating point of Brain-float precision. …

Categories: Linux fréttir

Battery Maker SK On Declares 'Emergency' As EV Sales Disappoint

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 07:34
"A leading South Korean producer of electric vehicle batteries has declared itself in crisis," reports the Financial Times, "as its customers struggle with disappointing EV sales in Europe and the US." SK On, the world's fourth-largest EV battery maker behind Chinese giants CATL and BYD and South Korean rival LG Energy Solution, has recorded losses for 10 consecutive quarters since being spun off by its parent company in 2021. Its net debt has increased more than fivefold, from Won2.9tn ($2.1bn) to Won15.6tn over the same period, as western EV sales have fallen far short of its expectations. With losses snowballing, chief executive Lee Seok-hee announced a series of cost-cutting and working practice measures last Monday, describing them as a state of "emergency management". "We have our back against the wall," Lee wrote in a letter to employees. "We should all pull together." [...] Tim Bush, a Seoul-based battery analyst at UBS, said the South Korean battery makers had been "badly let down" by US car manufacturers, which he said had failed to produce EVs sufficiently attractive to mass market consumers to meet their own bullish sales projections. He noted that until as recently as last year, General Motors was forecasting it would sell 1 million EVs in 2025. It sold just 21,930 in the second quarter of this year. Bush tells the Financial Times that "the automakers didn't invest enough in producing high-quality affordable EVs." But he also tells the newspaper that a transition to EVs is still "inevitable". "As long as the wider SK Group continues to see SK On as a trophy asset and gives it the support it needs to weather the present storm, then its long-term future is likely to be assured." Thanks to long-time Slashdot reader schwit1 for sharing the article.

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Largest UK Public Sector Trial of Four-Day Work Week Sees Huge Benefits

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 03:34
"In the largest public sector trial of the four-day week in Britain, fewer refuse collectors quit," reports the Guardian, "and there were faster planning decisions, more rapid benefits processing and quicker call answering, independent research has found." South Cambridgeshire district council's controversial experiment with a shorter working week resulted in improvements in performance in 11 out of 24 areas, little or no change in 11 areas and worsening of performance in two areas, according to analysis of productivity before and during the 15-month trial by academics at the universities of Cambridge and Salford... The multi-year study of the trial involving about 450 desk staff plus refuse collectors found: - Staff turnover fell by 39%, helping save £371,500 in a year, mostly on agency staff costs. - Regular household planning applications were decided about a week and a half earlier. - Approximately 15% more major planning application decisions were completed within the correct timescale, compared with before. - The time taken to process changes to housing benefit and council tax benefit claims fell.... Under the South Cambridgeshire trial, which began in January 2023 and ran to April 2024, staff were expected to carry out 100% of their work in 80% of the time for 100% of the pay. The full trial cut staff turnover by 39% and scores for employees' physical and mental health, motivation and commitment all improved, the study showed. "Coupled with the hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayer money that we have saved, improved recruitment and retention and positives around health and wellbeing, this brave and pioneering trial has clearly been a success," said John Williams, the lead council member for resources... Scores of private companies have already adopted the approach, with many finding it helps staff retention. Ryle said the South Cambridgeshire results "prove once and for all that a four-day week with no loss of pay absolutely can succeed in a local government setting". Thanks to long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo for sharing the article.

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YouTube Investigators Say MSI Exposed 600K+ Warranty Records Via an Open Server

Slashdot - Sun, 2024-07-14 01:18
ewhac (Slashdot reader #5,844) writes: Friday the hardware review site Gamers Nexus filed a YouTube video report alleging some serious claims: that PC component manufacturer MSI left their internal warranty and RMA processing web site accessible to the open Internet, with no authentication. Virtually the entire history of MSI warranty claims going back to at least 2017 were searchable and accessible for the browsing, including customer names, email addresses, phone numbers, and serial numbers of MSI devices. This event follows closely on the heels of a video report just a few days earlier alleging PC component manufacturer Zotac left their warranty/RMA and B2B records server open to indexing by Google. Gamers Nexus posted their reports after informing Zotac and MSI of their open servers and verifying they were no longer accessible. However, the data from MSI's server could have been fully scraped at this point, giving scammers a gold mine of data permitting them to impersonate MSI personnel and defraud customers. Anyone who's filed a warranty or RMA claim with MSI in the past seven years should exercise caution when receiving unsolicited emails or phone calls purporting to be from MSI.

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After Criticism, Signal Agrees to Secure Plain-Text Encryption Keys for Users' Message Databases

Slashdot - Sat, 2024-07-13 21:55
"Signal is finally tightening its desktop client's security," reports BleepingComputer — by changing the way it stores plain text encryption keys for the SQLite database where users' messages are stored: When BleepingComputer contacted Signal about the flaw in 2018, we never received a response. Instead, a Signal Support Manager responded to a user's concerns in the Signal forum, stating that the security of its database was never something it claimed to provide. "The database key was never intended to be a secret. At-rest encryption is not something that Signal Desktop is currently trying to provide or has ever claimed to provide," responded the Signal employee... [L]ast week, mobile security researchers Talal Haj Bakry and Tommy Mysk of Mysk Inc warned on X not to use Signal Desktop because of the same security weakness we reported on in 2018... In April, an independent developer, Tom Plant, created a request to merge code that uses Electron's SafeStorage API "...to opportunistically encrypt the key with platform APIs like DPAPI on Windows and Keychain on macOS," Plant explained in the merge request... When used, encryption keys are generated and stored using an operating system's cryptography system and secure key stores. For example, on Macs, the encryption key would be stored in the Keychain, and on Linux, it would use the windows manager's secret store, such as kwallet, kwallet5, kwallet6, and gnome-libsecret... While the solution would provide additional security for all Signal desktop users, the request lay dormant until last week's X drama. Two days ago, a Signal developer finally replied that they implemented support for Electron's safeStorage, which would be available soon in an upcoming Beta version. While the new safeStorage implementation is tested, Signal also included a fallback mechanism that allows the program to decrypt the database using the legacy database decryption key... Signal says that the legacy key will be removed once the new feature is tested. "To be fair to Signal, encrypting local databases without a user-supplied password is a problem for all applications..." the article acknowledges. "However, as a company that prides itself on its security and privacy, it was strange that the organization dismissed the issue and did not attempt to provide a solution..."

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Joe Engle, the Last Living X-15 Pilot, Passed Away July 10 At the Age of 91

Slashdot - Sat, 2024-07-13 20:34
clovis (Slashdot reader #4,684) writes: Joe Engle received his astronaut wings in a ceremony on July 15, 1965, for his flight in the hypersonic aircraft, reaching an altitude of 50 miles above the Earth. At 32, he was the youngest man to become an astronaut. Later, he entered the Apollo program and eventually commanded the STS-2 flight of the Space Shuttle. Here is an interview from 2004. I thought it was interesting that they used the F-104 as the chase plane and for training because the flight characteristics were so similar, which says a lot about the F-104. Anyway, the X-15 project was a big deal for us science/geek types back when I was a kid. I wonder if it's something today's generation is even aware of.

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Nasty Spoofing Attack Resurrects Internet Explorer Vulnerability in Windows 10 and 11

Slashdot - Sat, 2024-07-13 19:34
Slashdot reader joshuark shared this report from BetaNews: Check Point Research has identified a critical zero-day spoofing attack exploiting Microsoft Internet Explorer on modern Windows 10/11 systems, despite the browser's retirement. Identified as CVE-2024-38112, this vulnerability allows attackers to execute remote code by tricking users into opening malicious Internet Shortcut (.url) files. This attack method has been active for over a year and could potentially impact millions... Attackers use a sophisticated trick to mask the malicious .hta extension, making use of the outdated security of Internet Explorer to compromise systems running updated Windows operating systems. From Check Point Research: Even though IE has been proclaimed "retired and out-of-support," technically speaking, IE is still part of the Windows OS and is "not inherently unsafe, as IE is still serviced for security vulnerabilities, and there should be no known exploitable security vulnerabilities," according to our communications with Microsoft.

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Linksys Routers Found Transmitting Passwords in Cleartext

Slashdot - Sat, 2024-07-13 18:34
TechSpot writes: Users of the Linksys Velop Pro 6E and 7 mesh routers should change their passwords and Wi-Fi network names through an external web browser. The two models transmit critical information to outside servers in an insecure manner upon initial installation. New patches have emerged since the issue was discovered, but Linksys hasn't publicly responded to the matter, and it is unclear if the latest firmware leaves sensitive data exposed to interception. The issue was discovered by Testaankoop, the Belgian equivalent of the Consumers' Association. And they warned Linksys back in November, according to the tech news site Stack Diary. (The practice could leave passwords and other information vulnerable to Man-in-the-Middle attacks.) Testaankoop suspects the security issue might stem from third-party software used in the Linksys firmware. However, they emphasize that this does not excuse the vulnerability. Thanks to long-time Slashdot reader schwit1 for sharing the news.

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Admiral Grace Hopper's Landmark Lecture Is Found, But the NSA Won't Release It

Slashdot - Sat, 2024-07-13 17:34
MuckRock is a U.S.-based 501(c)(3) non-profit collaborative news site to "request, analyze and share government documents," according to its web site. And long-time Slashdot reader schwit1 shared their report about a lecture by Admiral Grace Hopper: In a vault at the National Security Agency lies a historical treasure: two AMPEX 1-inch open reel tapes containing a landmark lecture by Admiral Grace Hopper, a giant in the field of computer science. Titled 'Future Possibilities: Data, Hardware, Software, and People,' this lecture, recorded on August 19, 1982, at the NSA's Fort Meade headquarters, and stored in the video archives of the National Cryptographic School, offers a rare glimpse into the mind of a pioneer who shaped the very fabric of technology. Yet this invaluable artifact remains inaccessible, trapped in an obsolete format that the NSA will not release, stating that the agency is unable to play it back. "NSA is not required to find or obtain new technology (outdated or current) in order to process a request," states the official response from the agency. But MuckRock adds that on June 25, "responding to a follow-up request, the NSA at least provided an image of the tape labels," leading MuckRock to complain that the NSA "is well-positioned to locate, borrow and use a working VTR machine to access Admiral Hopper's lectures... The NSA, with its history of navigating complex technological landscapes and decrypting matters of national significance, does not typically shy away from a challenge." The challenge of accessing these recordings is not just technical, but touches on broader issues around preserving technological heritage.... It is our shared obligation to safeguard such pivotal elements of our nationâ(TM)s history, ensuring they remain within reach of future generations. While the stewardship of these recordings may extend beyond the NSAâ(TM)s typical purview, they are undeniably a part of Americaâ(TM)s national heritage.

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