Linux fréttir

As Coronavirus Surveillance Escalates, Personal Privacy Plummets

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 14:45
Tracking entire populations to combat the pandemic now could open the doors to more invasive forms of government snooping later. From a report: In South Korea, government agencies are harnessing surveillance-camera footage, smartphone location data and credit card purchase records to help trace the recent movements of coronavirus patients and establish virus transmission chains. In Lombardy, Italy, the authorities are analyzing location data transmitted by citizens' mobile phones to determine how many people are obeying a government lockdown order and the typical distances they move every day. About 40 percent are moving around "too much," an official recently said. In Israel, the country's internal security agency is poised to start using a cache of mobile phone location data -- originally intended for counterterrorism operations -- to try to pinpoint citizens who may have been exposed to the virus. As countries around the world race to contain the pandemic, many are deploying digital surveillance tools as a means to exert social control, even turning security agency technologies on their own civilians. Health and law enforcement authorities are understandably eager to employ every tool at their disposal to try to hinder the virus -- even as the surveillance efforts threaten to alter the precarious balance between public safety and personal privacy on a global scale. Yet ratcheting up surveillance to combat the pandemic now could permanently open the doors to more invasive forms of snooping later. It is a lesson Americans learned after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, civil liberties experts say. Nearly two decades later, law enforcement agencies have access to higher-powered surveillance systems, like fine-grained location tracking and facial recognition -- technologies that may be repurposed to further political agendas like anti-immigration policies. Civil liberties experts warn that the public has little recourse to challenge these digital exercises of state power.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

TeamViewer is going to turn around and ignore what you're doing with its freebie licence to help new remote workers

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 14:27
No connection-checking while society crumbles, but corporate customers will have to keep paying

Remote control and support outfit TeamViewer is turning off connection checking for its freebie product as more and more of its customers find themselves suddenly working from home.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

A Third of Coronavirus Cases May Be 'Silent Carriers', Classified Chinese Data Suggests

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 14:05
The number of "silent carriers" -- people who are infected by the new coronavirus but show delayed or no symptoms -- could be as high as one-third of those who test positive, according to classified Chinese government data seen by the South China Morning Post. An anonymous reader writes: That could further complicate the strategies being used by countries to contain the virus, which has infected more than 300,000 people and killed more than 14,000 globally. More than 43,000 people in China had tested positive for Covid-19 by the end of February but had no immediate symptoms, a condition typically known as asymptomatic, according to the data. They were placed in quarantine and monitored but were not included in the official tally of confirmed cases, which stood at about 80,000 at the time. Scientists have been unable to agree on what role asymptomatic transmission plays in spreading the disease. A patient usually develops symptoms in five days, though the incubation period can be as long as three weeks in some rare cases.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Self-driving truck boss: 'Supervised machine learning doesn’t live up to the hype. It isn’t C-3PO, it’s sophisticated pattern matching'

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 13:28
Starsky Robotics shuts down, plus more news from world of neural networks

Roundup Let's get cracking with some machine-learning news.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Germany says nein to Euro Unified Patent Court, pulls plug and leaves it nearby if anyone wants to put it back in

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 12:32
Top court says UPC was not properly approved but only on a technicality

Germany’s constitutional court has ruled that the long-planned Unified Patent Court (UPC), which would create a single legislature for the whole of Europe to decide on patents, is invalid.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Yes, you can build your business in the public cloud: Tune in live online next month to find out exactly how

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 11:30
Public’s the new private – tell your friends

Webcast While early adopters jumped right into the first generation of cloud services, you may have held off – and perhaps for good reason. Now the second generation is upon us, you may be wondering if this is the right time to join the revolution.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Your Agile-built IT platform was 'terrible', Co-Op Insurance chief complained to High Court

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 10:47
Mark Summerfield didn't hold back in written evidence

A £175m IT platform for Co-Op Insurance that was subcontracted out by IBM to a third party was a "disaster" despite assurances it was an "out of the box" product, the insurer's CEO told London's High Court.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

is a 'Debt Jubilee' The Only Way to Avoid a Depression?

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 10:34
The Washington Post just ran an interesting op-ed from a research professor of economics at the University of Missouri: Massive social distancing, with its accompanying job losses, stock dives and huge bailouts to corporations, raises the threat of a depression. But it doesn't have to be this way. History offers us another alternative in such situations: a debt jubilee. This slate-cleaning, balance-restoring step recognizes the fundamental truth that when debts grow too large to be paid without reducing debtors to poverty, the way to hold society together and restore balance is simply to cancel the bad debts... The U.S. economy has polarized sharply since the 2008 crash. For far too many, their debts leave little income available for consumer spending or spending in the national interest. In a crashing economy, any demand that newly massive debts be paid to a financial class that has already absorbed most of the wealth gained since 2008 will only split our society further.... The way to restore normalcy today is a debt write-down. The debts in deepest arrears and most likely to default are student debts, medical debts, general consumer debts and purely speculative debts. They block spending on goods and services, shrinking the "real" economy. A write-down would be pragmatic, not merely moral sympathy with the less affluent. In fact, it could create what the Germans called an "Economic Miracle" -- their own modern debt jubilee in 1948, the currency reform administered by the Allied Powers. When the Deutsche Mark was introduced, replacing the Reichsmark, 90 percent of government and private debt was wiped out. Germany emerged as an almost debt-free country, with low costs of production that jump-started its modern economy... In the past, the politically powerful financial sector has blocked a write-down. Until now, the basic ethic of most of us has been that debts must be repaid. But it is time to recognize that most debts now cannot be paid -- through no real fault of the debtors in the face of today's economic disaster. "Critics warn of a creditor collapse and ruinous costs to government," the op-ed argues. "But if the U.S. government can finance $4.5 trillion in quantitative easing, it can absorb the cost of forgoing student and other debt."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Forget about those pesky closures, Windows 10 has an important message for you

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 10:00
Remember the three rules: social distancing, hand washing, giving Windows enough storage

Bork!Bork!Bork! Welcome to another instalment of The Register's occasional series reminding IT professionals to check their public facing orifices.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Workday will PaaS up the opportunity to open its platform to third parties

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 09:15
HR and finance cloud vendor focuses on its own apps

Workday, the cloud-based Human Capital Management (HMC) and financial application company, is soft-peddling on the prospect of opening up its platform to third-party vendors.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

It's time to track people's smartphones to ensure they self-isolate during this global pandemic, says WHO boffin

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 08:33
Suspected carriers need to stay home – and we should use their phones to monitor them, we're told

Tracking the movements of suspected COVID-19 coronavirus carriers has proved an essential tool in controlling the pandemic, according to Professor Marylouise McLaws.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

First impressions count when the world is taken by surprise by an exciting new (macro) virus

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 08:08
Almost 30 years of VBA and the mayhem miscreants wrought with it

Who, Me? Welcome to Who, Me?, The Register's weekly reminder, thanks to the recollections of our readers, of a time when it was only viruses of the computer variety that were all the rage.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Coronavirus Cases Have Dropped Sharply In South Korea. What's Its Secret?

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 07:38
South Korea "has emerged as a sign of hope and a model to emulate," reported Nature earlier on Tuesday. "The country of 50 million appears to have greatly slowed its epidemic; it reported only 74 new cases today, down from 909 at its peak on 29 February." And it has done so without locking down entire cities or taking some of the other authoritarian measures that helped China bring its epidemic under control. "South Korea is a democratic republic, we feel a lockdown is not a reasonable choice," says Kim Woo-Joo, an infectious disease specialist at Korea University. South Korea's success may hold lessons for other countries — and also a warning: Even after driving case numbers down, the country is braced for a resurgence. Behind its success so far has been the most expansive and well-organized testing program in the world, combined with extensive efforts to isolate infected people and trace and quarantine their contacts. South Korea has tested more than 270,000 people, which amounts to more than 5200 tests per million inhabitants — more than any other country except tiny Bahrain, according to the Worldometer website. The United States has so far carried out 74 tests per 1 million inhabitants, data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show. South Korea's experience shows that "diagnostic capacity at scale is key to epidemic control," says Raina MacIntyre, an emerging infectious disease scholar at the University of New South Wales, Sydney. "Contact tracing is also very influential in epidemic control, as is case isolation," she says... Legislation enacted since [2015] gave the government authority to collect mobile phone, credit card, and other data from those who test positive to reconstruct their recent whereabouts. That information, stripped of personal identifiers, is shared on social media apps that allow others to determine whether they may have crossed paths with an infected person... There are 43 drive-through testing stations nationwide, a concept now copied in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. In the first week of March, the Ministry of the Interior also rolled out a smartphone app that can track the quarantined and collect data on symptoms. "We hope our experience will help other countries control this COVID-19 outbreak," Kim tells Nature. And Reuters reports that in the five days since the article was published, South Korea has still kept new infections around a low 100 or less each day -- for 12 consecutive days -- compared with the peak of 909 new cases reported on February 29. Reuters adds that though South Korea has experienced 8,961 cases, on Monday it reported its lowest daily number yet for new cases -- 64. And on the same day, "257 patients were released from hospitals where they had been isolated for treatment, the KCDC said. "South Korea posted more recoveries than new infections on March 13 for the first time since its first case was confirmed on January 20."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

No, the head of the World Health Organization has not emailed you – it's a message laced with malware

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 07:02
On the other hand, these Pwn2Own results are legit

Roundup It is time for another Reg security summary.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Equinix closes data centres to non-critical visits in France, Germany, Italy and Spain

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 05:58
Goes appointment-only elsewhere, pledges to have enough staff on-site to keep running

Equinix has all-but closed its data centres in France, Germany, Italy and Spain as of Monday, March 23 at 8:00am central European time.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Facebook Will Donate 720,000 Masks and 1.5 Million Gloves to Healthcare Workers

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 04:41
The San Francisco Chronicle reports: Facebook plans to donate 720,000 masks — a combination of the coveted N95 respirators and more basic surgical masks — and 1.5 million pairs of gloves to health care workers around the world. Facebook officials said they bought the masks for their offices' emergency disaster kits following wildfires in California. Facebook has already donated 375,000 masks and 867,000 pairs of gloves to county officials in Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, who are expected to distribute them to hospitals... Facebook also said it has donated $650,000 worth of food to more than a dozen Bay Area senior centers, schools and other organizations, including Food Runners SF, Peninsula Volunteers Meals on Wheels and the East Palo Alto Senior Center. Meanwhile, the company sent $250,000 to the Sequoia Union High School District in San Mateo County to pay for 2,000 Wi-Fi hotspots and a year of Wi-Fi for low-income students who need to complete their work online during shelter in place but don't have a reliable connection. The company, which is the dominant employer in its headquarters city but also has large offices in San Francisco, Mountain View and other Bay Area cities, also pledged to give $500,000 to multiple homelessness prevention organizations in the Bay Area — and promised more local support. The article notes America's scarcity of masks and other gear "became so dire in Washington state that medical workers made 500 masks out of vinyl, tape, foam and elastic purchased at Home Depot." And it also has an update on how other companies are pitching in around America. "[F]actories that crank out cars and trucks were looking into making much-needed ventilators. Distilleries intended for beer, whiskey and rum transformed to instead turn out hand sanitizers and disinfectants. And an electronics maker that builds display screens was repurposed for surgical masks."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Linus Torvalds ponders: Is Linux 5.6 going well because it's bug-free, or thanks to that <i>other</i> bug?

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 04:29
‘The world around us may be going through strange times, but so far kernel development looks normal’ says Penguin emperor

Linus Torvalds has released a new release candidate of the Linux kernel – version 5.6 rc7 - and added a little COVID-19 commentary.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

McDonald's Is Closing All Its Restaurants in the UK

Slashdot - Mon, 2020-03-23 01:45
An anonymous reader quotes the BBC: McDonald's will close all 1,270 of its restaurants in the UK by the end of Monday, as fears over the spread of coronavirus escalate. Previously, the fast food giant had closed its seating areas but had continued to offer takeaway and drive-through services. McDonald's said it wanted to protect the wellbeing of staff and customers. On Friday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said restaurants and cafes must close, but exempted take-away food places. McDonald's employs around 135,000 people in the UK, the majority of which are on zero-hours contracts. The chain said staff employed directly by the company would receive full pay for their scheduled hours until 5 April. By that time it expects the government's financial aid package, announced on Friday, to have kicked in, with staff paid 80% of their wages. McDonald's UK boss, Paul Pomroy, told the BBC they made the decision because "it has become clear that maintaining safe social distancing whilst operating busy takeaway and Drive Thru restaurants is increasingly difficult."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

India makes new push to lure global electronics manufacturers

TheRegister - Mon, 2020-03-23 01:35
To protect and grow its own industries. But first, call your mother and enjoy this five-minute national round of applause for medicos and transport workers

India has announced new incentives to lure electronics manufacturers to its shores.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

What Happens When Tech Companies Offer to Fight Coronavirus With Digital Surveillance?

Slashdot - Sun, 2020-03-22 23:57
"White House officials are asking tech companies for more insight into our social networks and travel patterns," reports Wired, noting that Facebook even "created a disease mapping tool that tracks the spread of disease by aggregating user travel patterns." And Clearview AI "says it is in talks with public officials to use its software to identify anyone in contact with people who are infected." Such efforts clash with people's expectations of privacy. Now, there's a compelling reason to collect and share the data; surveillance may save lives. But it will be difficult to draw boundaries around what data is collected, who gets to use it, and how long the collection will continue... "What's really important is for the government to be really clear in articulating what specific public health goals it's seeking to accomplish," said Kelsey Finch, senior counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum, an industry-backed group focused on tech policy. "And how it's limiting the collection of personal data to what's necessary to achieve those very specific goals, and then making sure that there are appropriate privacy safeguards put in place before data starts to change hands...." Some privacy scholars question whether enhanced surveillance in the name of fighting disease can be dialed back once the danger has passed. "I'm not sure that we should be making longer-term judgments, in an emergency situation, about what the right balance is right now," said Jennifer Daskal, faculty director of the Tech, Law, and Security program at American University and a former national security official in the Department of Justice. "That often doesn't work out so well." Pointing back to 9/11, when Congress granted immense surveillance powers to the federal government, Daskal said decisions made during emergency situations tend to lead to overreach... The rapid spread of the disease has prompted even some traditional defenders of personal privacy to acknowledge the potential benefits of digital tracking. "Public policy must reflect a balance between collective good and civil liberties in order to protect the health and safety of our society from communicable disease outbreaks," the Electronic Frontier Foundation wrote in a blog post earlier this month. But, the group continued, any data collection "must be scientifically justified and ⦠proportionate to the need."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Pages

Subscribe to netserv.is aggregator - Linux fréttir