Linux fréttir

You're getting warmer: NASA's thermal mole reveals active mantle plume on Mars

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 16:32
Discovery shows 'astrobiological potential of subsurface habitable environments'

Researchers have discovered a driver for volcanic activity on Mars, a red planet once thought to have no active seismic geology.…

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EU Hosted 24-Hour Party In Its $400,000 Metaverse. Very Few People Turned Up.

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 16:05
An anonymous reader shares a report: The European Union hosted a 24-hour party in its $407,000 metaverse, but only a handful of people turned up, according to journalist Vince Chadwick, one of the attendees. Last week's event was billed as a "beach party" offering "music and fun" to launch the EU's "Global Gateway" strategy. When the costly virtual-reality world was first shown in October, EU staff were already raising concerns, per Devex. "Depressing and embarrasing" and "digital garbage" were among the department's first responses to the underwhelming $407,000 venue. The EU told the news site that its metaverse aimed to increase awareness among 18-35 year olds "primarily on TikTok and Instagram" who aren't politically engaged. But as it moved from promotional video to virtual reality, it seems the message didn't reach too many people. Chadwick tweeted about his experience at the party, saying that there were just five other people in attendance. He described "bemused chats" with the other partygoers, as they couldn't figure out where it was supposed to be.

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Working Apple-1 'Byte Shop' computer expected to fetch $375k+

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 15:30
What do you mean, you don't think historic handwriting is worth it?

A "clean and unused" prototype Apple-1 that actually works has been put up for auction by purveyor of Curpertino relics RR Auctions.…

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Adobe Will Sell AI-made Stock Images

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 15:20
Adobe is opening its stock images service to creations made with the help of generative AI programs like Dall-E and Stable Diffusion, the company said. From the report: While some see the emerging AI creation tools as a threat to jobs or a legal minefield (or both), Adobe is embracing them. At its Max conference in October, Adobe outlined a broad role it sees generative AI playing in the future of content generation, saying it sees AI as a complement to, not a replacement for, human artists. Adobe says it is now accepting images submitted from artists who have made use of generative AI on the same terms as other works, but requires that they be labeled as such. It quietly started testing such images before officially announcing the move today. "We were pleasantly surprised," Adobe senior director Sarah Casillas told Axios. "It meets our quality standards and it has been performing well," she said.

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Windows 11 still not winning the OS popularity contest

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 15:03
Microsoft releases out of box experience update to simplify and speed up migrations

Microsoft has released an out-of-band update to nudge laggards toward Windows 11 amid a migration pace that company executives would undoubtedly prefer is rather faster.…

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AI-Generated Answers Temporarily Banned on Coding Site Stack Overflow

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 14:41
Stack Overflow, the go-to question-and-answer site for programmers, has temporarily banned users from sharing responses generated by AI chatbot ChatGPT. From a report: The site's mods said that the ban was temporary and that a final ruling would be made some time in the future after consultation with its community. But, as the mods explained, ChatGPT simply makes it too easy for users to generate responses and flood the site with answers that seem correct at first glance but are often wrong on close examination. Further reading: What is ChatGPT, the AI Chatbot That's Taking The Internet By Storm.

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As the Arctic Warms, Beavers Are Moving In

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 14:00
It began decades ago, with a few hardy pioneers slogging north across the tundra. It's said that one individual walked so far to get there that he rubbed the skin off the underside of his long, flat tail. Today, his kind have homes and colonies scattered throughout the tundra in Alaska and Canada -- and their numbers are increasing. Beavers have found their way to the far north. From a report: It's not yet clear what these new residents mean for the Arctic ecosystem, but concerns are growing, and locals and scientists are paying close attention. Researchers have observed that the dams beavers build accelerate changes already in play due to a warming climate. Indigenous people are worried the dams could pose a threat to the migrations of fish species they depend on. "Beavers really alter ecosystems," says Thomas Jung, senior wildlife biologist for Canada's Yukon government. In fact, their ability to transform landscapes may be second only to that of humans: Before they were nearly extirpated by fur trappers, millions of beavers shaped the flow of North American waters. In temperate regions, beaver dams affect everything from the height of the water table to the kinds of shrubs and trees that grow. Until a few decades ago, the northern edge of the beaver's range was defined by boreal forest, because beavers rely on woody plants for food and material to build their dams and lodges. But rapid warming in the Arctic has made the tundra more hospitable to the large rodents: Earlier snowmelt, thawing permafrost and a longer growing season have triggered a boom in shrubby plants like alder and willow that beavers need. Aerial photography from the 1950s showed no beaver ponds at all in Arctic Alaska. But in a recent study, Ken Tape, an ecologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, scanned satellite images of nearly every stream, river and lake in the Alaskan tundra and found 11,377 beaver ponds.

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Startup raises $30 million for wireless power delivery system

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 13:30
Not the first company in the game to chase cable-free charging dragon

A wireless power startup has secured $30 million in funding to help develop its technology, with which it aims to "do for power what Wi-Fi has done for data."…

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2022's Geeky 'Advent Calendars' Tempt Programmers with Coding Challenges and Tips

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 12:34
"The Perl Advent Calendar has come a long way since it's first year in 2000," says an announcement on Reddit. But in fact the online world now has many daily advent calendars aimed at programmers — offering tips about their favorite language or coding challenges. The HTMHell site — which bills itself as "a collection of bad practices in HTML, copied from real websites" — decided to try publishing 24 original articles for their 2022 HTMHell Advent Calendar. Elsewhere on the way there's the Web Performance Calendar, promising daily articles for speed geeks. And the 24 Days in December blog comes to life every year with new blog posts for PHP users. The JVM Advent Calendar brings a new article daily about a JVM-related topic. And there's also a C# Advent calendar promising two new blog posts about C# every day up to (and including) December 25th. The Perl Advent Calendar offers fun stories about Perl tools averting December catastrophes up at the North Pole. (Day One's story — "Silent Mite" — described Santa's troubles building software for a ninja robot alien toy, since its embedded hardware support contract prohibited unwarrantied third-party code, requiring a full code rewrite using Perl's standard library.) Other stories so far this December include "Santa is on GitHub" and "northpole.cgi" The code quality/security software company SonarSource has a new 2022 edition of their Code Security Advent Calendar — their seventh consecutive year — promising "daily challenges until December 24th. Get ready to fill your bag of security tricks!" (According to a blog post the challenges are being announced on Twitter and on Mastadon. Just as the Perl community spawn another language named Perl 6 — now called Raku — there's also a Raku-themed advent calendar. (It's now at a new URL, though it's been running since 2009.) Day Three's post tells the story of Santa and the Rakupod Wranglers. "24 Pull Requests" dares participants to make 24 pull requests before December 24th. (The site's tagline is "giving back to open source for the holidays.") Over the years tens of thousands of developers (and organizations) have participated — and this year they're also encouraging organizers to hold hack events. The Advent of JavaScript and Advent of CSS sites promise 24 puzzles delivered by email (though you'll have to pay if you also want them to email you the solutions!) TryHackMe.com has its own set of darily cybersecurity puzzles (and even a few prizes). For 2022 Oslo-based Bekk Consulting (a "strategic internet consulting company") is offering an advent calendar of their own. A blog post says its their sixth annual edition, and promises "new original articles, podcasts, tutorials, listicles and videos every day up until Christmas Eve... all written and produced by us - developers, designers, project managers, agile coaches, management consultants, specialists and generalists." Whether you participate or not, the creation of programming-themed advent calendar sites is a long-standing tradition among geeks, dating back more than two decades. (Last year Smashing magazine tried to compile an exhaustive list of the various sites serving all the different developer communities.) But no list would be complete without mentioning Advent of Code. This year's programming puzzles involve everything from feeding Santa's reindeer and loading Santa's sleigh. The site's About page describes it as "an Advent calendar of small programming puzzles for a variety of skill sets and skill levels that can be solved in any programming language you like." Now in its eighth year, the site's daily two-part programmig puzzles have a massive online following. This year's Day One puzzle was solved by 178,628 participants...

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Quantum computing is a different kind of computing, says AWS

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 12:30
The intersection of computer science and physics

RE:INVENT "It's very early days in quantum computing," Simone Severini, director of Quantum Computing at AWS tells The Reg.…

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Tech contractor who uses an umbrella company? UK tax is coming after them

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 11:52
Britain's wallet-checkers suspect VAT avoidance from some of them – to the tune of 10,000-case tribunal backlog

Britain's tax collection agency is clamping down on umbrella companies used by contractors to pay their dues, with 10,000 outstanding tribunal cases waiting to be heard.…

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A brand new Linux DRM display driver – for a 1992 computer

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 10:30
680x0: the CPU architecture that just will not die

Feature A patch to add a new display driver for Linux is being reviewed. What's unusual is that it's for a machine released 30 years ago.…

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Killing trees with lasers isn’t cool, says Epson. So why are inkjets any better?

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 09:31
Imagine there's no printer drivers. It's easy if you can...

Long-term dot matrix printer maker Epson has just announced it is ending its 35 year long experiment in selling laser-powered printer hardware. From 2026, the company says it'll be inkjet only – although it will probably still sell you a new dot-matrix if you ask nicely.…

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Meet DTV's Successor: NextGen TV

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 08:34
Around 2009 Slashdot was abuzz about how over-the-air broadcasting in North America was switching to a new standard called DTV. (Fun fact: North America and South America have two entirely different broadcast TV standards — both of which are different from the DVB-T standard used in Europe/Africa/Australia.) But 2022 ends with us already talking about DTV's successor in North America: the new broadcast standard NextGen TV. This time the new standard isn't mandatory for TV stations, CNET points out — and it won't affect cable, satellite or streaming TV. But now even if you're not paying for a streaming TV service, another article points out, in most major American cities "an inexpensive antenna is all you'll need to get get ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC and PBS stations" — and often with a better picture quality: NextGen TV, formerly known as ATSC 3.0, is continuing to roll out across the U.S. It's already widely available, with stations throughout the country broadcasting in the new standard. There are many new TVs with compatible tuners plus several stand-alone tuners to add NextGen to just about any TV. As the name suggests, NextGen TV is the next generation of over-the-air broadcasts, replacing or supplementing the free HD broadcasts we've had for over two decades. NextGen not only improves on HDTV, but adds the potential for new features like free over-the-air 4K and HDR, though those aren't yet widely available. Even so, the image quality with NextGen is likely better than what you're used to from streaming or even cable/satellite. If you already have an antenna and watch HD broadcasts, the reception you get with NextGen might be better, too.... Because of how it works, you'll likely get better reception if you're far from the TV tower. The short version is: NextGen is free over-the-air television with potentially more channels and better image quality than older over-the-air broadcasts. U.S. broadcast companies have also created a site at WatchNextGenTV.com showing options for purchasing a compatible new TV. That site also features a video touting NextGen TV's "brilliant colors and a sharper picture with a wider range of contrast" and its Dolby audio system (with "immersive, movie theatre-quality sound" with enhancements for voice and dialogue "so you get all of the story.") And in the video there's also examples of upcoming interactive features like on-screen quizzes, voting, and shopping, as well as the ability to select multiple camera angles or different audio tracks. "One potential downside? ATSC 3.0 will also let broadcasters track your viewing habits," CNet reported earlier this year, calling the data "information that can be used for targeted advertising, just like companies such as Facebook and Google use today... "Ads specific to your viewing habits, income level and even ethnicity (presumed by your neighborhood, for example) could get slotted in by your local station.... but here's the thing: If your TV is connected to the internet, it's already tracking you. Pretty much every app, streaming service, smart TV and cable or satellite box all track your usage to a greater or lesser extent." But on the plus side... NextGen TV is IP-based, so in practice it can be moved around your home just like any internet content can right now. For example, you connect an antenna to a tuner box inside your home, but that box is not connected to your TV at all. Instead, it's connected to your router. This means anything with access to your network can have access to over-the-air TV, be it your TV, your phone, your tablet or even a streaming device like Apple TV.... This also means it's possible we'll see mobile devices with built-in tuners, so you can watch live TV while you're out and about, like you can with Netflix and YouTube now. How willing phone companies will be to put tuners in their phones remains to be seen, however. You don't see a lot of phones that can get radio broadcasts now, even though such a thing is easy to implement. But whatever you think — it's already here. By August NextGen TV was already reaching half of America's population, according to a press release from a U.S. broadcaster's coalition. That press release also bragged that 40% of consumers had actually heard of NextGen TV — "up 25% from last year among those in markets where it is available."

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Square Kilometre Array Observatory construction commences

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 08:13
World's biggest radio telescope to have first parts up and running by 2024

After thirty years of development, the Square Kilometre Array Observatory (SKAO) announced Monday it has commenced construction of its radio telescopes in both South Africa and Australia.…

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Programming error created billion-dollar mistake that made the coder ... a hero?

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 07:01
No crypto needed, just a project with a tough deadline that nobody minded missing

who, me? Ah, dear readers, welcome once again to Who, Me? in which Reg readers confess the times their reach exceeded their grasp, technology-wise-speaking.…

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Remuneration coming for TrustCor customers impacted by CA revocation

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 05:45
Also, a Capone henchman lands behind bars, while nearly 9/10 DoD contract firms fail security standards

In brief Certificate Authority TrustCor responded to its ejection from Mozilla and Microsoft's browsers by offering refunds for some customers, while leaving others to pick up the mess on their own.…

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Amazon Builds a New Drone - But Is It Falling Behind Other Drone Delivery Services?

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 05:04
Axios reports: As Amazon prepares to debut its long-delayed Prime Air drone delivery service, it's also showing off a smaller, quieter drone that will be ready in 2024 and could be making regular deliveries in major cities by the end of the decade. The 80-pound hexagon-shaped aircraft, about 5 and a half feet in diameter, is nimble enough to make deliveries in highly populated areas such as Boston, Atlanta and Seattle. It'll be more capable and less intrusive than the model Amazon is using in its Prime Air service, which will begin in two markets — Lockeford, California, and College Station, Texas — in the coming weeks.... Thousands of items could be eligible for drone delivery as long as they fit in one box and weigh less than 5 pounds total. The drones fly 50 miles per hour (80 km), according to the article, and "Upon arrival, the drone descends, scans the area to make sure it's clear, then drops the box from a height of about 12 feet." (With sturdy packaging to eliminate the need for parachutes or lines.) This drone can even fly in light rain, according to Axios, and has "sense-and-avoid" safety features "that allow it to operate at greater distances while skirting other aircraft, people, pets and obstacles." One Amazon executive estimates that by 2030 Amazon will be delivering 500 million packages by drone each year. But Axios also suggests Amazon may be lagging its competitors. Walmart already has $3.99 drone delivery in six states — for up to 100,000 different products, weighing up to 10 pounds. And there's also other drone delivery services from Zipline and Google-owned Wing that have already launched limited-area commercial services.

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Rackspace customers rage as email outage continues and migrations create migraines

TheRegister - Mon, 2022-12-05 04:45
Hosting company has nothing to say on data loss, restore times, or root cause

Rackspace has not offered any explanation of the "security incident" that has taken out its hosted Exchange environment and led the company to predict multiple days of downtime before restoration.…

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Over 50 Programmers Generate 50,000-Word Novels For 9th Annual 'Nanogenmo' Event

Slashdot - Mon, 2022-12-05 02:34
Long-time Slashdot reader destinyland writes: Since 1999 fiction writers have tried starting and finishing the composition of 50,000-word novels in November for "National Novel Writing Month". But for the last nine years, programmers have instead tried generating 50,000 word novels — and this year's edition received more than 50 entries. "The only rule is that you share at least one novel and also your source code at the end," explains the event's official page on GitHub. From the repository's README file: The "novel" is defined however you want. It could be 50,000 repetitions of the word "meow" (and yes it's been done!). It could literally grab a random novel from Project Gutenberg. It doesn't matter, as long as it's 50k+ words. Please try to respect copyright. We're not going to police it, as ultimately it's on your head if you want to just copy/paste a Stephen King novel or whatever, but the most useful/interesting implementations are going to be ones that don't engender lawsuits. This year's computer-generated novels include " sunday in the sunday in the," mapping the colors from each dot in the Pointillist painting Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte onto words from the lyrics of a musical about that painting. ("Rush blind. Link adds shallot again....")

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