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HP printer small print says kit phones home data on whatever you print – and then some

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 15:25
Security engineer actually reads privacy policy to his horror

Hewlett-Packard Inc's printers don't just slurp the contents of your wallet at a frightening rate. They also guzzle a surprising amount of data on you and whatever you're printing.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

HP Printers Try To Send Data Back To HP About Your Devices and What You Print

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 14:56
Robert Heaton: Last week my in-laws politely but firmly asked me to set up their new HP printer. I protested that I'm completely clueless about that sort of thing, despite my tax-return-job-title of "software engineer." Still remonstrating, I was gently bundled into their study with an instruction pamphlet, a cup of tea, a promise to unlock the door once I'd printed everyone's passport forms, and a warning not to try the window because the roof tiles are very loose. At first the setup process was so simple that even a computer programmer could do it. But then, after I had finished removing pieces of cardboard and blue tape from the various drawers of the machine, I noticed that the final step required the downloading of an app of some sort onto a phone or computer. This set off my crapware detector. [...] It was a way to try and get people to sign up for expensive ink subscriptions and/or hand over their email addresses, plus something even more nefarious that we'll talk about shortly (there were also some instructions for how to download a printer driver tacked onto the end). This was a shame, but not unexpected. I'm sure that the HP ink department is saddled with aggressive sales quotas, and no doubt the only way to hit them is to ruthlessly exploit people who don't know that third-party cartridges are just as good as HP's and are much cheaper. Fortunately, the careful user can still emerge unscathed from this phase of the setup process by gingerly navigating the UI patterns that presumably do fool some people who aren't paying attention.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

.NET Core 3.0 thought it was all ready for release. And it would have been too, if it weren't for those pesky Visual Studio kids

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 14:50
Hi, remember us? We share a toolset. And have another preview to do?

Having promised there wouldn't be any more previews, Microsoft has dropped a release candidate for the upcoming .NET Core 3.0 framework.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Brit government WLTM one Chief Digi Info Officer

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 14:16
Required: GSoH, plus ability to make ends meet on up to £180k a year

UK.gov is on the lookout for a Government Chief Digital Information Officer (GCDIO) - a permanent secretary role that sets the strategic direction of travel for public sector IT in return for up to £180,000 a year.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

The Internet Relies on People Working for Free

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 14:06
Who should be responsible for maintaining and troubleshooting open-source projects? From a report: When you buy a product like Philips Hue's smart lights or an iPhone, you probably assume the people who wrote their code are being paid. While that's true for those who directly author a product's software, virtually every tech company also relies on thousands of bits of free code, made available through "open-source" projects on sites like GitHub and GitLab. Often these developers are happy to work for free. Writing open-source software allows them to sharpen their skills, gain perspectives from the community, or simply help the industry by making innovations available at no cost. According to Google, which maintains hundreds of open-source projects, open source "enables and encourages collaboration and the development of technology, solving real-world problems." But when software used by millions of people is maintained by a community of people, or a single person, all on a volunteer basis, sometimes things can go horribly wrong. The catastrophic Heartbleed bug of 2014, which compromised the security of hundreds of millions of sites, was caused by a problem in an open-source library called OpenSSL, which relied on a single full-time developer not making a mistake as they updated and changed that code, used by millions. Other times, developers grow bored and abandon their projects, which can be breached while they aren't paying attention. It's hard to demand that programmers who are working for free troubleshoot problems or continue to maintain software that they've lost interest in for whatever reason -- though some companies certainly try. Not adequately maintaining these projects, on the other hand, makes the entire tech ecosystem weaker. So some open-source programmers are asking companies to pay, not for their code, but for their support services. Daniel Stenberg is one of those programmers. He created cURL, one of the world's most popular open-source projects.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

UK Home Office web form snafu allows you to both agree and disagree – strongly – all at once

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 13:30
Government cares what you think. Honest

A UK Home Office consultation on new, intrusive police powers was so incompetently written that you could both "strongly agree" and "strongly disagree" at the same time when answering its questions.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Neural networks. Sparse data. TensorFlow. PyTorch. Text mining. Ethics – and lots more. We've got every angle of AI covered at MCubed

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 13:00
Join us and our awesome speakers for a hearty no-hype pure-tech deep dive

Event Whether you’re worried about the machines taking over, or think it can’t happen soon enough, you should get yourselves down to MCubed at the end of the month.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Square Wants To Be a Bank But Doesn't Want To Be Taxed Like One

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 13:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Wall Street Journal: Square has lent $5 billion to small businesses and consumers and applied for a banking license. It operates a nationwide mobile money-transfer business that serves 15 million Americans. But Square says it isn't a financial company. The San Francisco-based payments processor filed a lawsuit last week against its home city to recover $1.3 million in taxes, plus interest and attorneys' fees. Square argued that San Francisco was wrong to classify it as a financial company for tax purposes because it is a technology company that should be subject to a lower tax rate. The refund Square is seeking from San Francisco relates to excess taxes it believes it paid for 2014 and 2015, years when Square was a much smaller company. Square disclosed in its most recent securities filing that it may have to pay San Francisco additional taxes for subsequent years if it was unable to convince the city it was a tech company. The company said in its complaint that its San Francisco operations more closely resemble a technology company than a financial-services firm. The company has roughly 2,200 employees in San Francisco. Square also said in its lawsuit that San Francisco overstates Square's gross receipts because it includes money that the company doesn't get to keep. Square takes a 2.75% cut of most credit-card payments to its small-business customers. More than half of what Square derives from those transactions must be paid out to banks and credit-card networks, the company said. San Francisco's treasurer and tax collector, Jose Cisneros, said that his office's audit of Square was "thorough and fair" and that he stands by its findings. Mr. Cisneros is also a defendant in the case.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

NASA's lunar spy looks for hide-and-seek champ Vikram, Starliner test success, and more

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 12:33
Happy 43rd birthday to Space Shuttle Enterprise

Roundup Unlike SpaceX's Crew Dragon, which plops down in the ocean at the end of a mission (ideally in one piece), Boeing's CST-100 Starliner is designed to land on, er, land. As NASA and Boeing inch ever closer to its first crewed launch, rehearsals were conducted last week to practice locating a capsule, safing it and preparing for hatch opening.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Google age discrimination case: Supervisor called me 'grandpa', engineer claims

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 11:45
Suit filed alleging HR failed to protect staffer from harassment

Google has been hit by another age discrimination lawsuit, just two months after the search giant settled a previous case brought by over 200 people.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

UK.gov's smart meter cost-benefit analysis for 2019 goes big on cost, easy on the benefits

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 11:00
Did someone mention a delay? Rollout given another 4 years as price tag soars to £13.4bn

The UK government has confirmed that electricity suppliers have an extra four years to hit targets for installing smart meters.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

You look like a fungi. Got mushroom in your life to build stuff with mycelium computers?

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 10:04
IRL Star Trek: Discovery, sort of

The Unconventional Computing Laboratory in Bristol is looking for a research associate to help it create buildings with embedded fungus-created computers.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Disney signs on with Microsoft, SQLCMD arrives in Data Studio and Azure goes German

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 09:05
Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho, it's off to test we go...

Roundup While the speculation machine for Microsoft's mystery hardware event ramped up (although still a mere ripple compared to the spurtings around anything to do with Apple), the Redmond gang continued to toil. Here are some of the stories you might have missed.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Google Preps 'Smart Screenshots' Feature To Let You Search With a Screenshot

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 09:00
According to Abner Li from 9to5Google, Google is working on a new "Smart Screenshots" feature that integrates Google Lens abilities into the Google app's screenshot function. From the report: The Google app has long had an "Edit & share screenshots" ability where captures made within Search would reveal cropping and annotation tools. Meanwhile, Assistant has long maintained a "What's on my screen" capability that analyzes what you're currently viewing for search suggestions. Google app 10.61 reveals work on "Smart Screenshots" that combine those two features. Like before, a toolbar -- which interestingly uses a four-color light bar -- appears after you take a screenshot. A small preview is shown at the left with a pencil button overlaid. You can open the system share sheet, but the Google app also suggests a frequently used app. The most interesting addition is Lens. "Exploring with Lens" could be intended as a "Screen search" replacement given that Lens is increasingly taking over visual lookup throughout first-party apps, like Chrome. After taking a capture, Smart Screenshots have an easy way to invoke Lens for search, OCR, and finding visually "similar items." The existing editing tools (Annotating, Cropping, and Sharing) will remain and this new functionality appears to even use the same settings toggle to enable. It's unclear if this functionality once live will again be limited to screenshots taken within Search, or if it will expand to be systemwide and invokable anywhere. A notification from the Google app could appear after capturing a screenshot.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

First they came for 'face' and I did not speak out because I... have no face? Then they came for 'book'

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 08:03
Don't panic: Off and f*ck still free from Zuckerberg, for now

Facebook has applied to trademark the word "book" in Europe.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Is it time to update your data warehouse and retool your analytics? Google Cloud's gurus are here to guide you

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 07:30
Get the answers you need this month – and ready your systems for the 2020s

Promo If you are beginning to wonder whether your familiar old data warehouse and analytics solutions can keep pace with the fast-moving modern world, you should check out today's state-of-the-art data-handling and analytics systems.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Boffins build AI that can detect cyber-abuse – and if you don't believe us, YOU CAN *%**#* *&**%* #** OFF

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 06:58
Alternatively, you can try to overpower it with your incredibly amazing sarcasm

Trolls, morons, and bots plaster toxic crap all over Twitter and other antisocial networks. Can machine learning help clean it up?…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Stallman's final interview as FSF president: Last week we quizzed him over Microsoft visit. Now he quits top roles amid Epstein email storm

TheRegister - Tue, 2019-09-17 05:11
GNU founder resigns after Minsky defense 'the final straw' for dev world

Interview Shortly after The Register learned that Richard Stallman, founder and then president of the Free Software Foundation and creator of the GNU Project, had been invited to speak at Microsoft's corporate headquarters, we emailed him to ask about the apparent incongruity of advocating for software freedom at a company singled out by the FSF as a maker of malware.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Richard Stallman Resigns From MIT

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 05:00
Multiple Slashdotters are reporting the unfortunate news that famed free software advocate and computer scientist Richard Stallman has resigned from MIT. Slashdot reader iamacat writes: Following outrage over his remarks about Jefferey Epstein's victims, Richard Stallman has resigned from his position in MIT, effective immediately. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss him -- even if you didn't enjoy his work, there's no denying his contributions to popular culture. Truly an American icon. "I am resigning effective immediately from my position in CSAIL at MIT," Stallman wrote in an email, referring to MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. "I am doing this due to pressure on MIT and me over a series of misunderstandings and mischaracterizations." Stallman also resigned as president from the Free Software Foundation (FSF) as well as from the organization's board of directors, FSF announced shortly after.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Spouse of Ring Exec Among Lawmakers Trying To Weaken California Privacy Law

Slashdot - Tue, 2019-09-17 03:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The California legislature worked through the summer to finalize the text of the state's landmark data privacy law before time to make amendments ran out on Friday. In the Assembly (California's lower house), Assemblywoman Jacqui Irwin has been a key voice and vote backing motions that would weaken the law, and a new report says her reasoning may be very, very close to home. A review of state ethics documents conducted by Politico found that Ms. Irwin is married to Jon Irwin, the chief operating officer of Amazon's controversial Ring home surveillance business. That company stands to benefit if the California law is weakened in certain key ways before it can take effect. One proposal put forth by Assemblywoman Irwin would expand what kind of data would be exempt from CCPA provisions, and this drew the ire of consumer protection groups, Politico reports. Irwin also initially proposed striking out "a provision requiring companies to disclose or delete data associated with 'households' upon request," a regulation that will likely affect companies like Ring. She also voted against an amendment that would have required smart speaker systems, like Amazon's Alexa or Google Home, to obtain user consent to sell recorded conversations, and "used store security-camera footage as an example of data that would be burdensome and risky for businesses to be required to link to consumers in response to data-deletion requests." Assemblywoman Irwin told Politico she found questions about her spouse to be offensive, given her own personal background as a systems engineer. "My role in the privacy debate in the Legislature is focused on bringing people together and solving the practical issues posed to us as policy makers and is independent of any job or role my husband may have," she said. The California Consumer Privacy Act was signed into law in June 2018 by California nGovernor Gavin Newsom. "This legislation gives California residents several protections with regard to their personal information, including the rights to know what is being collected, what is being sold, and to whom it is being sold," reports Ars Technica. "It also grants Californians the right to access their personal information, the right to delete data collected from them, and the right to opt out -- without being charged extra for services if they choose to do so."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

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