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Wi-Fi woes and broken browser target both young and old in Microsoft patch land

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 18:02
The last Surface RT user just needs to fill in a web form to... oh heck

The bad news bus has continued rolling for users of hardware both young and old as Wi-Fi woes plague Windows 10 and even Windows 8.1.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

SoftBank Backers Rethink Role in Next Vision Fund on WeWork

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 17:23
The biggest backers of SoftBank's gargantuan Vision Fund are reconsidering how much to commit to its next investment vehicle as an oversized bet on flexible workspace provider WeWork sours. From a report: Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund, which contributed $45 billion to the $100 billion Vision Fund, is now only planning to reinvest profits from that vehicle into its successor, according to people familiar with the talks. Abu Dhabi's Mubadala Investment, which invested $15 billion, is considering paring its future commitment to below $10 billion, the people said, asking not to be identified in disclosing internal deliberations. A partial retreat of the two anchor investors would complicate fundraising for SoftBank Chief Executive Officer Masayoshi Son, who upended venture capital by making huge bets on promising yet unproven companies and spurring others to follow suit. Perhaps more than any other startup, WeWork has come to symbolize that brash style, and the success or failure of its IPO is likely to impact Son's ability to raise cash for future deals.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Amazon Changed Search Algorithm in Ways That Boost Its Own Products

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 16:40
Amazon.com has adjusted its product-search system to more prominently feature listings that are more profitable for the company, WSJ reported Monday citing people who worked on the project, a move, contested internally, that could favor Amazon's own brands. From the report: Late last year, these people said, Amazon optimized the secret algorithm that ranks listings so that instead of showing customers mainly the most-relevant and best-selling listings when they search -- as it had for more than a decade -- the site also gives a boost to items that are more profitable for the company. The adjustment, which the world's biggest online retailer hasn't publicized, followed a yearslong battle between executives who run Amazon's retail businesses in Seattle and the company's search team, dubbed A9, in Palo Alto, Calif., which opposed the move, the people said. Any tweak to Amazon's search system has broad implications because the giant's rankings can make or break a product. The site's search bar is the most common way for U.S. shoppers to find items online, and most purchases stem from the first page of search results, according to marketing analytics firm Jumpshot. The issue is particularly sensitive because the U.S. and the European Union are examining Amazon's dual role -- as marketplace operator and seller of its own branded products. An algorithm skewed toward profitability could steer customers toward thousands of Amazon's in-house products that deliver higher profit margins than competing listings on the site. Further reading: Amazon Falls After Report That the Company Prioritized Profit in Its Search Listings.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Linux 5.3 kernel bundles new, cuddlier, swear-free Torvalds with AMD Radeon Navi graphics support

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 16:38
Guv'nor explains regression again, without the expletives

A softer, gentler Linus Torvalds released the Linux 5.3 kernel over the weekend and swung open the doors on 5.4.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Just as Ecuador thought it had seen the back of leaks, over 20m citizen records are exposed

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 16:02
And Julian Assange is among them - but how old are these?

Records on more than 20 million individuals in Ecuador have leaked from an unsecured database in Miami, Florida, containing a mix of official citizen registration data and personal & banking details.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Database Leaks Data on Most of Ecuador's Citizens, Including 6.7 Million Children

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 16:00
The personal records of most of Ecuador's population, including children, has been left exposed online due to a misconfigured database, ZDNet reported Monday. From the report: The database, an Elasticsearch searver, was discovered two weeks ago by vpnMentor security researchers Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, who shared their findings exclusively with ZDNet. Together, we worked to analyze the leaking data, verify its authenticity, and contact the server owner. The leaky server is one of the, if not the biggest, data breaches in Ecuador's history, a small South American country with a population of 16.6 million citizens. The Elasticsearch server contained a total of approximately 20.8 million user records, a number larger than the country's total population count. The bigger number comes from duplicate records or older entries, containing the data of deceased persons.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

LastPass Bug Leaks Credentials From Previous Site

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 15:20
Password manager LastPass has released an update last week to fix a security bug that exposes credentials entered on a previously visited site. From a report: The bug was discovered last month by Tavis Ormandy, a security researcher with Project Zero, Google's elite security and bug-hunting team. LastPass, believed to be the most popular password manager app today, fixed the reported issue in version 4.33.0, released last week, on September 12. If users have not enabled an auto-update mechanism for their LastPass browser extensions or mobile apps, they're advised to perform a manual update as soon as possible. This is because yesterday, Ormandy published details about the security flaw he found. The security researcher's bug report walks an attacker through the steps necessary to reproduce the bug.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Microsoft plays chicken with Extended Support for Exchange 2010 end date and swerves first

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 15:16
Extension to October 2020. But what of Server 2008 or... Windows 7?

Microsoft has blinked and told customers that support for Exchange 2010 is to be kicked back from 14 January 2020 to 13 October of the same year.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

World's oldest human <i>was</i> a 122-year-old French smoker after all

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 15:03
Researchers debunk tax-fraud imposter theory

Russian claims that the world's oldest-ever human on record actually had her identity stolen by her daughter have been trashed by a paper published today in The Journals of Gerontology.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Mozilla and Creative Commons Want To Reimagine the Internet Without Ads, and They Have $100M To Do It

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 14:40
An anonymous reader shares a report: Funding online content with small consumer payments rather than intrusive and privacy-compromising ads has for years been a goal for many internet theorists and publishers. "We're at a point where it's clear there's kinds of negative side effects for people and even for democracy of the data-driven ad economy that funds the internet," says Mark Surman, executive director of the Mozilla Foundation. Now, Mozilla, Creative Commons, and a new micropayment startup have announced a $100 million grant program to finally bring that dream to fruition. The program, called Grant for the Web, will give roughly $20 million per year for five years to content sites, open source infrastructure developers, and others building around Web Monetization, a proposed browser standard for micropayments. "When we started Coil, Coil was essentially the first Web Monetization provider," says founder and CEO Stefan Thomas. Coil users pay a fixed monthly fee that's distributed among sites they visit that have Web Monetization enabled, such as the web development site CSS-Tricks, based on how long they visit the sites. The underlying technology supports other providers routing user funding as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Australia didn't blame China for parliament hack in case it upset trade relations – report

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 14:04
So much for the public deterrence value of attribution

Australian spooks concluded that China was to blame for a series of hacks on its parliament and leading political parties – but kept it quiet for fear of angering the Middle Kingdom, according to reports.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Russia Carried Out a 'Stunning' Breach of FBI Communications System, Escalating the Spy Game on US Soil

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 14:00
Zach Dorfman, Jenna McLaughlin, and Sean D. Naylor, reporting for Yahoo News: On Dec. 29, 2016, the Obama administration announced that it was giving nearly three dozen Russian diplomats just 72 hours to leave the United States and was seizing two rural East Coast estates owned by the Russian government. As the Russians burned papers and scrambled to pack their bags, the Kremlin protested the treatment of its diplomats, and denied that those compounds -- sometimes known as the "dachas" -- were anything more than vacation spots for their personnel. The Obama administration's public rationale for the expulsions and closures -- the harshest U.S. diplomatic reprisals taken against Russia in several decades -- was to retaliate for Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. But there was another critical, and secret, reason why those locations and diplomats were targeted. Both compounds, and at least some of the expelled diplomats, played key roles in a brazen Russian counterintelligence operation that stretched from the Bay Area to the heart of the nation's capital , according to former U.S. officials. The operation, which targeted FBI communications, hampered the bureau's ability to track Russian spies on U.S. soil at a time of increasing tension with Moscow, forced the FBI and CIA to cease contact with some of their Russian assets, and prompted tighter security procedures at key U.S. national security facilities in the Washington area and elsewhere, according to former U.S. officials. It even raised concerns among some U.S. officials about a Russian mole within the U.S. intelligence community. "It was a very broad effort to try and penetrate our most sensitive operations," said a former senior CIA official. American officials discovered that the Russians had dramatically improved their ability to decrypt certain types of secure communications and had successfully tracked devices used by elite FBI surveillance teams. Officials also feared that the Russians may have devised other ways to monitor U.S. intelligence communications, including hacking into computers not connected to the internet. Senior FBI and CIA officials briefed congressional leaders on these issues as part of a wide-ranging examination on Capitol Hill of U.S. counterintelligence vulnerabilities.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Google told: If you could cough up a decade of your internal emails, that'd be great

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 13:04
Oh, and you have four weeks to comply, says US antitrust probe

The US House of Representatives Judiciary Committee has written to the big four tech giants – Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google – demanding comprehensive information on its financial structures and 10 years' worth of emails between top executives.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

UK Home Office primes Brexit spam cannon for a million texts reminding folk to check passports

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 12:03
New validity rules in event of no deal for Brits travelling to EU

The UK Home Office will send a million text messages reminding people that the rules for travelling to the European Union will change in the event of a no-deal Brexit on 31 October.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Au my bog: Bloke, 66, on bail after 'solid-gold' crapper called 'America' stolen from stately home

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 11:07
Creator denies it's a prank

Blenheim Palace was forced to close its doors on Saturday following the theft of a solid-gold loo – a piece of art called "America".…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Extreme Weather Events This Decade Have Cost America $750B

Slashdot - Mon, 2019-09-16 10:44
An anonymous reader quotes NBC News: An analysis of weather disasters that did more than $1 billion in damage from the National Centers for Environmental Information finds that such high-cost events are up markedly since the 1980s. (The dollar figures for the events were adjusted for inflation.) There have been 250 such events since 1980 and almost half them, 111, have occurred in the current decade. And the 2019 figure does not include any events after May, so Hurricane Dorian is not on the list yet. There were only 28 billion-dollar weather events in the 1980s. There is a wide range of events in that extreme weather calculation. Besides hurricanes, it includes floods, droughts, freezes, severe storms, wildfires and winter storms. And there are some trends in the data. For instance, there were seven freeze/winter storm events on the list in the 1980s, but only six (so far) in the current decade. But there were only seven severe storms on the 1980s list and 64 in the current decade... The 28 high-impact weather events in the 1980s cost a total of about $172 billion in inflation-adjusted dollars. But the current set of 111 storms this decade has cost a total of more than $761 billion dollars. Again, that does not include the costs of Dorian and of two other events on the list -- the March floods in the Midwest and May floods of the Southern Plains. When you tally it all up, the costs are likely to end up at three-quarters of a trillion dollars or more. And that's just for this decade. At this pace, the number seems all but certain to climb over the trillion-dollar mark in the 2020s. And then there are the human costs. The number of fatalities from these extreme weather events has largely been climbing -- from 2,800 in the 1980s to almost 5,200 this decade (again before Dorian's damage is added in).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Linux fréttir

Has outsourcing public-sector IT worked? The Institute for Government seems to think so, kinda

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 10:00
Prepare Reg readers, it is time to enter an alternate reality where up is down, black is white and Capita is cuddly

The outsourcing of government IT projects has largely worked, according to a cornflake-spluttering report by the Institute for Government.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

COBOL: Five little letters that if put on a CV would ensure stable income for many a greybeard coder

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 09:09
EVALUATE COBOL-AGE WHEN 60 CONTINUE

COBOL is celebrating 60 years since its specifications were signed off. Darling of Y2K consultants, the language is rapidly approaching pensionable age, but many a greybeard owes their career to it.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Pushing Verify in Brexit plans more about saving troubled project

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 08:10
Broken ID system isn't going to track you. No one's using it!

Analysis The Government Digital Service's troubled identity system Verify has been at the heart of a controversial plan to supposedly track users online in the run-up to Brexit. However, its unlikely role in Brexit preparations may be more about GDS finding an excuse to save the moribund platform than anything more sinister.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

Justice served: There is no escape from the long server log of the law

TheRegister - Mon, 2019-09-16 07:04
A handover or handcuffs? Take your pick, eh?

Who, Me? Bid farewell to the weekend and a cheery hello to work with a tale of a near-cuffing in our regular Who, Me? column.…

Categories: Linux fréttir

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